Microstructure-based modeling of deformation in steels based on constitutive relationships from micropillar compression

En Yu Guo, Sudhanshu S. Singh, Hu Xiao Xie, Jason J. Williams, Tao Jing, Nikhilesh Chawla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Microstructure-based finite element modeling was performed on different microstructures of an austenitic-ferritic cast duplex stainless steel using the constitutive behavior of individual phase obtained from micropillar compression tests. A qualitative analysis of equivalent plastic strain and von Mises stress was conducted in plane stress and plane strain conditions. The simulated results reveal that the morphology and the area fraction of the second phase can affect the mechanical properties. The stress values and the equivalent plastic strain in the shear bands are higher in plane strain loading than plane stress loading condition. Stress is concentrated mostly in ferrite phase. The evolution of stress during deformation is found to be dependent on the morphologies of ferrite phase in austenite matrix. Microstructure-based finite element modeling has been performed on different microstructures of an austenitic-ferritic stainless steel using the constitutive behavior of individual phase obtained from micropillar compression tests. The simulated plastic strain and stress distribution reveal the effect of area fraction, morphology as well as the distribution of ferrite phase on the mechanical properties of the material.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)946-953
Number of pages8
JournalSteel Research International
Volume85
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Keywords

  • cast duplex stainless steel
  • finite element method
  • micropillar compression
  • plastic strain localization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Materials Chemistry

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