Mexican-Origin College Students’ Stress, Sibling Relationships, Academic Motivation, and Depressive Symptoms

Samantha K. Jones, Sarah E. Killoren, Gabrielle C. Kline, Edna C. Alfaro, Fiorella Carlos Chavez, Eric Salinas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study investigated associations among interpersonal, academic, financial, and ethnicity-related stressors and college students’ academic motivation and depressive symptoms, as well as the moderating role of positive sibling relationships on these associations. Participants included 171 Mexican-origin college students (80.7% female; M = 21.6 years). Data were collected using an online survey and analyzed with path analysis. Under conditions of more positive sibling relationships, there was a positive association between interpersonal stress and academic motivation, a negative association between ethnicity-related social stress and academic motivation, and a positive association between financial stress and depressive symptoms. Under conditions of less positive sibling relationships, there was a positive association between interpersonal stress and depressive symptoms. Findings suggest that sibling relationships may only be protective for certain types of stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Family Issues
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • academic motivation
  • depression
  • Mexican
  • sibling relationships
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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