Abstract

Metals can accumulate in soils amended with biosolids in which metals have been concentrated during wastewater treatment. The goal of this study is to inspect agricultural sites with long-term biosolid application for a suite of regulated and unregulated metals, including some potentially present as commonly used engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Sampling occurred in fields at a municipal and a privately operated biosolid recycling facilities in Texas. Depth profiles of various metals were developed for control soils without biosolid amendment and soils with different rates of biosolid application (6.6 to 74. dry tons per hectare per year) over 5 to 25. years. Regulated metals of known toxicity, including chromium, copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc, had higher concentrations in the upper layer of biosolid-amended soils (top 0-30. cm or 0-15. cm) than in control soils. The depth profiles of unregulated metals (antimony, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, gold, silver, tantalum, tin, tungsten, and zirconium) indicate higher concentrations in the 0-30. cm soil increment than in the 70-100. cm soil increment, indicating low vertical mobility after entering the soils. Titanium-containing particles between 50. nm and 250. nm in diameter were identified in soil by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. In conjunction with other studies, this research shows the potential for nanomaterials used in society that enter the sewer system to be removed at municipal biological wastewater treatment plants and accumulate in agricultural fields. The metal concentrations observed herein could be used as representative exposure levels for eco-toxicological studies in these soils.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-449
Number of pages9
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume485-486
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2014

Fingerprint

Biosolids
biosolid
Metals
Nanoparticles
Soils
metal
soil
Nanostructured materials
Wastewater treatment
Hafnium
Niobium
nanoparticle
Tantalum
hafnium
tantalum
Antimony
niobium
Tungsten
Molybdenum
Tin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

Metal and nanoparticle occurrence in biosolid-amended soils. / Yang, Yu; Wang, Yifei; Westerhoff, Paul; Hristovski, Kiril; Jin, Virginia L.; Johnson, Mari Vaughn V; Arnold, Jeffrey G.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 485-486, No. 1, 01.07.2014, p. 441-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Yu ; Wang, Yifei ; Westerhoff, Paul ; Hristovski, Kiril ; Jin, Virginia L. ; Johnson, Mari Vaughn V ; Arnold, Jeffrey G. / Metal and nanoparticle occurrence in biosolid-amended soils. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2014 ; Vol. 485-486, No. 1. pp. 441-449.
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