Abstract

Many studies have reported abnormal gut microbiota in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), suggesting a link between gut microbiome and autism-like behaviors. Modifying the gut microbiome is a potential route to improve gastrointestinal (GI) and behavioral symptoms in children with ASD, and fecal microbiota transplant could transform the dysbiotic gut microbiome toward a healthy one by delivering a large number of commensal microbes from a healthy donor. We previously performed an open-label trial of Microbiota Transfer Therapy (MTT) that combined antibiotics, a bowel cleanse, a stomach-acid suppressant, and fecal microbiota transplant, and observed significant improvements in GI symptoms, autism-related symptoms, and gut microbiota. Here, we report on a follow-up with the same 18 participants two years after treatment was completed. Notably, most improvements in GI symptoms were maintained, and autism-related symptoms improved even more after the end of treatment. Important changes in gut microbiota at the end of treatment remained at follow-up, including significant increases in bacterial diversity and relative abundances of Bifidobacteria and Prevotella. Our observations demonstrate the long-term safety and efficacy of MTT as a potential therapy to treat children with ASD who have GI problems, and warrant a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5821
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Fingerprint

Microbiota
Autistic Disorder
Therapeutics
Prevotella
Behavioral Symptoms
Bifidobacterium
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Stomach
Placebos
Tissue Donors
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Safety
Acids
Autism Spectrum Disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Long-term benefit of Microbiota Transfer Therapy on autism symptoms and gut microbiota. / Kang, Dae Wook; Adams, James; Coleman, Devon M.; Pollard, Elena L.; Maldonado, Juan; McDonough-Means, Sharon; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 9, No. 1, 5821, 01.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kang, Dae Wook ; Adams, James ; Coleman, Devon M. ; Pollard, Elena L. ; Maldonado, Juan ; McDonough-Means, Sharon ; Caporaso, J. Gregory ; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa. / Long-term benefit of Microbiota Transfer Therapy on autism symptoms and gut microbiota. In: Scientific reports. 2019 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
@article{a6835b2209c24011ac01aeb5ee5fc3ad,
title = "Long-term benefit of Microbiota Transfer Therapy on autism symptoms and gut microbiota",
abstract = "Many studies have reported abnormal gut microbiota in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), suggesting a link between gut microbiome and autism-like behaviors. Modifying the gut microbiome is a potential route to improve gastrointestinal (GI) and behavioral symptoms in children with ASD, and fecal microbiota transplant could transform the dysbiotic gut microbiome toward a healthy one by delivering a large number of commensal microbes from a healthy donor. We previously performed an open-label trial of Microbiota Transfer Therapy (MTT) that combined antibiotics, a bowel cleanse, a stomach-acid suppressant, and fecal microbiota transplant, and observed significant improvements in GI symptoms, autism-related symptoms, and gut microbiota. Here, we report on a follow-up with the same 18 participants two years after treatment was completed. Notably, most improvements in GI symptoms were maintained, and autism-related symptoms improved even more after the end of treatment. Important changes in gut microbiota at the end of treatment remained at follow-up, including significant increases in bacterial diversity and relative abundances of Bifidobacteria and Prevotella. Our observations demonstrate the long-term safety and efficacy of MTT as a potential therapy to treat children with ASD who have GI problems, and warrant a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in the future.",
author = "Kang, {Dae Wook} and James Adams and Coleman, {Devon M.} and Pollard, {Elena L.} and Juan Maldonado and Sharon McDonough-Means and Caporaso, {J. Gregory} and Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41598-019-42183-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term benefit of Microbiota Transfer Therapy on autism symptoms and gut microbiota

AU - Kang, Dae Wook

AU - Adams, James

AU - Coleman, Devon M.

AU - Pollard, Elena L.

AU - Maldonado, Juan

AU - McDonough-Means, Sharon

AU - Caporaso, J. Gregory

AU - Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Many studies have reported abnormal gut microbiota in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), suggesting a link between gut microbiome and autism-like behaviors. Modifying the gut microbiome is a potential route to improve gastrointestinal (GI) and behavioral symptoms in children with ASD, and fecal microbiota transplant could transform the dysbiotic gut microbiome toward a healthy one by delivering a large number of commensal microbes from a healthy donor. We previously performed an open-label trial of Microbiota Transfer Therapy (MTT) that combined antibiotics, a bowel cleanse, a stomach-acid suppressant, and fecal microbiota transplant, and observed significant improvements in GI symptoms, autism-related symptoms, and gut microbiota. Here, we report on a follow-up with the same 18 participants two years after treatment was completed. Notably, most improvements in GI symptoms were maintained, and autism-related symptoms improved even more after the end of treatment. Important changes in gut microbiota at the end of treatment remained at follow-up, including significant increases in bacterial diversity and relative abundances of Bifidobacteria and Prevotella. Our observations demonstrate the long-term safety and efficacy of MTT as a potential therapy to treat children with ASD who have GI problems, and warrant a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in the future.

AB - Many studies have reported abnormal gut microbiota in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), suggesting a link between gut microbiome and autism-like behaviors. Modifying the gut microbiome is a potential route to improve gastrointestinal (GI) and behavioral symptoms in children with ASD, and fecal microbiota transplant could transform the dysbiotic gut microbiome toward a healthy one by delivering a large number of commensal microbes from a healthy donor. We previously performed an open-label trial of Microbiota Transfer Therapy (MTT) that combined antibiotics, a bowel cleanse, a stomach-acid suppressant, and fecal microbiota transplant, and observed significant improvements in GI symptoms, autism-related symptoms, and gut microbiota. Here, we report on a follow-up with the same 18 participants two years after treatment was completed. Notably, most improvements in GI symptoms were maintained, and autism-related symptoms improved even more after the end of treatment. Important changes in gut microbiota at the end of treatment remained at follow-up, including significant increases in bacterial diversity and relative abundances of Bifidobacteria and Prevotella. Our observations demonstrate the long-term safety and efficacy of MTT as a potential therapy to treat children with ASD who have GI problems, and warrant a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in the future.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064093985&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85064093985&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-019-42183-0

DO - 10.1038/s41598-019-42183-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 30967657

AN - SCOPUS:85064093985

VL - 9

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

IS - 1

M1 - 5821

ER -