Linking models of human behaviour and climate alters projected climate change

Brian Beckage, Louis J. Gross, Katherine Lacasse, Eric Carr, Sara S. Metcalf, Jonathan M. Winter, Peter D. Howe, Nina Fefferman, Travis Franck, Asim Zia, Ann Kinzig, Forrest M. Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although not considered in climate models, perceived risk stemming from extreme climate events may induce behavioural changes that alter greenhouse gas emissions. Here, we link the C-ROADS climate model to a social model of behavioural change to examine how interactions between perceived risk and emissions behaviour influence projected climate change. Our coupled climate and social model resulted in a global temperature change ranging from 3.4-6.2 °C by 2100 compared with 4.9 °C for the C-ROADS model alone, and led to behavioural uncertainty that was of a similar magnitude to physical uncertainty (2.8 °C versus 3.5 °C). Model components with the largest influence on temperature were the functional form of response to extreme events, interaction of perceived behavioural control with perceived social norms, and behaviours leading to sustained emissions reductions. Our results suggest that policies emphasizing the appropriate attribution of extreme events to climate change and infrastructural mitigation may reduce climate change the most.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-84
Number of pages6
JournalNature Climate Change
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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human behavior
climate change
climate
extreme event
climate modeling
event
uncertainty
greenhouse gas
mitigation
global change
temperature
Social Norms
interaction
attribution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Beckage, B., Gross, L. J., Lacasse, K., Carr, E., Metcalf, S. S., Winter, J. M., ... Hoffman, F. M. (2018). Linking models of human behaviour and climate alters projected climate change. Nature Climate Change, 8(1), 79-84. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-017-0031-7

Linking models of human behaviour and climate alters projected climate change. / Beckage, Brian; Gross, Louis J.; Lacasse, Katherine; Carr, Eric; Metcalf, Sara S.; Winter, Jonathan M.; Howe, Peter D.; Fefferman, Nina; Franck, Travis; Zia, Asim; Kinzig, Ann; Hoffman, Forrest M.

In: Nature Climate Change, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 79-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beckage, B, Gross, LJ, Lacasse, K, Carr, E, Metcalf, SS, Winter, JM, Howe, PD, Fefferman, N, Franck, T, Zia, A, Kinzig, A & Hoffman, FM 2018, 'Linking models of human behaviour and climate alters projected climate change', Nature Climate Change, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 79-84. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-017-0031-7
Beckage B, Gross LJ, Lacasse K, Carr E, Metcalf SS, Winter JM et al. Linking models of human behaviour and climate alters projected climate change. Nature Climate Change. 2018 Jan 1;8(1):79-84. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-017-0031-7
Beckage, Brian ; Gross, Louis J. ; Lacasse, Katherine ; Carr, Eric ; Metcalf, Sara S. ; Winter, Jonathan M. ; Howe, Peter D. ; Fefferman, Nina ; Franck, Travis ; Zia, Asim ; Kinzig, Ann ; Hoffman, Forrest M. / Linking models of human behaviour and climate alters projected climate change. In: Nature Climate Change. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 79-84.
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