Investigation of student learning in thermodynamics and implications for instruction in chemistry and engineering

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As part of an investigation into student learning of thermodynamics, we have probed the reasoning of students enrolled in introductory and advanced courses in both physics and chemistry. A particular focus of this work has been put on the learning difficulties encountered by physics, chemistry, and engineering students enrolled in an upper-level thermal physics course that included many topics also covered in physical chemistry courses. We have explored the evolution of students' understanding as they progressed from the introductory course through more advanced courses. Through this investigation we have gained insights into students' learning difficulties in thermodynamics at various levels. Our experience in addressing these learning difficulties may provide insights into analogous pedagogical issues in upper-level courses in both engineering and chemistry which focus on the theory and applications of thermodynamics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIP Conference Proceedings
Pages38-41
Number of pages4
Volume883
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event2006 Physics Education Research Conference, PERC 2006 - Syracuse, NY, United States
Duration: Jul 26 2006Jul 27 2006

Other

Other2006 Physics Education Research Conference, PERC 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySyracuse, NY
Period7/26/067/27/06

Fingerprint

students
learning
education
engineering
chemistry
thermodynamics
physics
physical chemistry

Keywords

  • Chemical education
  • Engineering education
  • Physics education
  • Thermodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Investigation of student learning in thermodynamics and implications for instruction in chemistry and engineering. / Meltzer, David.

AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 883 2007. p. 38-41.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Meltzer, D 2007, Investigation of student learning in thermodynamics and implications for instruction in chemistry and engineering. in AIP Conference Proceedings. vol. 883, pp. 38-41, 2006 Physics Education Research Conference, PERC 2006, Syracuse, NY, United States, 7/26/06. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2508686
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