Intervention leads to improvements in the nutrient profile of snacks served in afterschool programs: a group randomized controlled trial

Michael W. Beets, Brie Turner-McGrievy, R. Glenn Weaver, Jennifer Huberty, Justin B. Moore, Dianne S. Ward, Darcy A. Freedman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Widely adopted nutrition policies for afterschool programs (ASPs) focus on serving a fruit/vegetable daily and eliminating sugar-sweetened foods/beverages. The impact of these policies on the nutrient profile of snacks served is unclear. Evaluate changes in macro/micronutrient content of snacks served in ASPs. A 1-year group randomized controlled trial was conducted in 20 ASPs serving over 1700 elementary-age children. Intervention ASPs received a multistep adaptive framework intervention. Direct observation of snack served was collected and nutrient information determined using the USDA Nutrient Database, standardized to nutrients/100 kcal. By post-assessment, intervention ASPs reduced total kcal/snack served by 66 kcal (95CI −114 to −19 kcal) compared to control ASPs. Total fiber (+1.7 g/100 kcal), protein (+1.4 g/100 kcal), polyunsaturated fat (+1.2 g/100 kcal), phosphorous (+49.0 mg/100 kcal), potassium (+201.8 mg/100 kcal), and vitamin K (+21.5 μg/100 kcal) increased in intervention ASPs, while added sugars decreased (−5.0 g/100 kcal). Nutrition policies can lead to modest daily caloric reductions and improve select macro/micronutrients in snacks served. Long-term, these nutritional changes may contribute to healthy dietary habits.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)329-338
    Number of pages10
    JournalTranslational behavioral medicine
    Volume6
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

    Keywords

    • Children
    • Community-based programs
    • Dips
    • Food
    • Fruits
    • Nutrition
    • Obesity
    • Policy
    • School
    • Standards
    • Vegetables

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Applied Psychology
    • Behavioral Neuroscience

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