Interracial and intraracial contact, school-level diversity, and change in racial identity status among African American adolescents

Tiffany Yip, Eleanor Seaton, Robert M. Sellers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Among 224 African American adolescents (mean age = 14), the associations between interracial and intraracial contact and school-level diversity on changes in racial identity over a 3-year period were examined. Youths were determined to be diffused, foreclosed, moratorium, or achieved, and change or stability in identity status was examined. Contact with Black students, Black friends, and White friends predicted change in identity status. Furthermore, in racially diverse schools, having more Black friends was associated with identity stability. Students reporting low contact with Black students in racially diverse schools were more likely to report identity change if they had few Black friends. In students reporting high contact with Blacks in predominantly White schools, their identity was less likely to change for students with fewer White friends.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1431-1444
Number of pages14
JournalChild Development
Volume81
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

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African Americans
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adolescent
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education

Cite this

Interracial and intraracial contact, school-level diversity, and change in racial identity status among African American adolescents. / Yip, Tiffany; Seaton, Eleanor; Sellers, Robert M.

In: Child Development, Vol. 81, No. 5, 09.2010, p. 1431-1444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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