Intergenerational wealth transmission and the dynamics of inequality in small-scale societies

Monique Borgerhoff Mulder, Samuel Bowles, Tom Hertz, Adrian Bell, Jan Beise, Greg Clark, Lla Fazzio, Michael Gurven, Kim Hill, Paul L. Hooper, William Irons, Hillard Kaplan, Donna Leonetti, Bobbi Low, Frank Marlowe, Richard McElreath, Suresh Naidu, David Nolin, Patrizio Piraino, Rob Quinlan & 6 others Eric Schniter, Rebecca Sear, Mary Shenk, Eric Alden Smith, Christopher Von Rueden, Pauline Wiessner

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Abstract

Small-scale human societies range from foraging bands with a strong egalitarian ethos to more economically stratified agrarian and pastoral societies. We explain this variation in inequality using a dynamic model in which a population's long-run steady-state level of inequality depends on the extent to which its most important forms of wealth are transmitted within families across generations. We estimate the degree of intergenerational transmission of three different types of wealth (material, embodied, and relational), as well as the extent of wealth inequality in 21 historical and contemporary populations. We show that intergenerational transmission of wealth and wealth inequality are substantial among pastoral and small-scale agricultural societies (on a par with or even exceeding the most unequal modern industrial economies) but are limited among horticultural and foraging peoples (equivalent to the most egalitarian of modern industrial populations). Differences in the technology by which a people derive their livelihood and in the institutions and norms making up the economic system jointly contribute to this pattern.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)682-688
Number of pages7
JournalScience
Volume326
Issue number5953
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 30 2009

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Population
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Technology

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Intergenerational wealth transmission and the dynamics of inequality in small-scale societies. / Mulder, Monique Borgerhoff; Bowles, Samuel; Hertz, Tom; Bell, Adrian; Beise, Jan; Clark, Greg; Fazzio, Lla; Gurven, Michael; Hill, Kim; Hooper, Paul L.; Irons, William; Kaplan, Hillard; Leonetti, Donna; Low, Bobbi; Marlowe, Frank; McElreath, Richard; Naidu, Suresh; Nolin, David; Piraino, Patrizio; Quinlan, Rob; Schniter, Eric; Sear, Rebecca; Shenk, Mary; Smith, Eric Alden; Von Rueden, Christopher; Wiessner, Pauline.

In: Science, Vol. 326, No. 5953, 30.10.2009, p. 682-688.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mulder, MB, Bowles, S, Hertz, T, Bell, A, Beise, J, Clark, G, Fazzio, L, Gurven, M, Hill, K, Hooper, PL, Irons, W, Kaplan, H, Leonetti, D, Low, B, Marlowe, F, McElreath, R, Naidu, S, Nolin, D, Piraino, P, Quinlan, R, Schniter, E, Sear, R, Shenk, M, Smith, EA, Von Rueden, C & Wiessner, P 2009, 'Intergenerational wealth transmission and the dynamics of inequality in small-scale societies', Science, vol. 326, no. 5953, pp. 682-688. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1178336
Mulder MB, Bowles S, Hertz T, Bell A, Beise J, Clark G et al. Intergenerational wealth transmission and the dynamics of inequality in small-scale societies. Science. 2009 Oct 30;326(5953):682-688. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1178336
Mulder, Monique Borgerhoff ; Bowles, Samuel ; Hertz, Tom ; Bell, Adrian ; Beise, Jan ; Clark, Greg ; Fazzio, Lla ; Gurven, Michael ; Hill, Kim ; Hooper, Paul L. ; Irons, William ; Kaplan, Hillard ; Leonetti, Donna ; Low, Bobbi ; Marlowe, Frank ; McElreath, Richard ; Naidu, Suresh ; Nolin, David ; Piraino, Patrizio ; Quinlan, Rob ; Schniter, Eric ; Sear, Rebecca ; Shenk, Mary ; Smith, Eric Alden ; Von Rueden, Christopher ; Wiessner, Pauline. / Intergenerational wealth transmission and the dynamics of inequality in small-scale societies. In: Science. 2009 ; Vol. 326, No. 5953. pp. 682-688.
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