Inquiring into empire: Princeton Seminary's Society of Inquiry on Missions, the British Empire, and the opium trade, Ca. 1830-1850

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Princeton Seminary was intimately involved in the North American foreign missions movement in the nineteenth century. One remarkable dimension of this involvement came through the student-led Society of Inquiry on Missions, which sought to gather information about the global state of the Christian mission enterprise. This paper examines the Society's correspondence with Protestant missionaries in China regarding their attitudes to the British Empire in the years 1830-1850. It argues that the theological notion of providence informed Princetonians' perceptions of the world, which consequently dissociated the Christian missionary task with any particular nation or empire. An examination of the Society of Inquiry's correspondence during the mid-nineteenth century reveals much about Protestant missionaries and their interactions with the opium trade and the results of the First Opium War (1839-1842). Princetonians' responses to the opium trade and the First Opium War led ultimately to a significant critique of western commercial influence in East Asia. In conclusion, this paper questions the extent to which commerce, empire, and Christian missions were inherently associated in nineteenth century American Protestant missionary activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)194-219
Number of pages26
JournalMission Studies
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Seminary
Opium
British Empire
Opium War
Missionaries
Christian Mission
Interaction
Enterprise
East Asia
Missionary Activities
Commerce
Christian Missionaries
China

Keywords

  • British Empire
  • China
  • missions
  • opium
  • Princeton Theological Seminary
  • Society of Inquiry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • History

Cite this

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