Individual job-choice decisions and the impact of job attributes and recruitment practices: A longitudinal field study

Wendy R. Boswell, Mark V. Roehling, Marcie A. LePine, Lisa M. Moynihan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present research is intended to contribute to the understanding of how job-choice decisions are made and the role of effective and ineffective recruiting practices in that process. The issues are examined by tracking job seekers through the job search and choice process. At multiple points in the process, structured interviews are used to elicit information from the job seekers pertaining to how they are making their decision and what factors play a role. Results provide theoretical and practical insights into the organizational and job attributes important to job choice, as well as how specific recruiting practices may exert a significant influence, positive or negative, on job-choice decisions. For example, our findings reinforced the importance of providing job seekers the opportunity to meet with multiple (and high-level) organizational constituents, impressive site-visit arrangements, and frequent and prompt follow-up. Also, imposing a deadline (i.e., "exploding offer") showed little effect on job-choice decisions. Recommendations for recruitment practice and continued research are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-37
Number of pages15
JournalHuman Resource Management
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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