Independence and separability of volume and mass in the size-weight illusion

Crystal D. Oberle, Eric Amazeen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Numerous size-weight illusion models were classified in the present article according to general recognition theory (Ashby & Townsend, 1986), wherein the illusion results from a lack of perceptual separability, perceptual independence, decisional separability, or a combination of the three. These options were tested in two experiments in which a feature-complete factorial design and multidimensional signal detection analysis were used (Kadlec & Townsend, 1992a, 1992b). With haptic touch alone, the illusion was associated with a lack of perceptual and decisional separability. When the participant viewed the stimulus in his or her hand, the illusion was associated only with a lack of decisional separability. Visual input appeared to improve the discrimination of mass, leaving only the response bias due to expectation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-843
Number of pages13
JournalPerception and Psychophysics
Volume65
Issue number6
StatePublished - Aug 2003

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Weights and Measures
lack
Touch
stimulus
discrimination
Hand
experiment
trend
Separability
Illusion
Recognition (Psychology)
Psychological Signal Detection
Discrimination (Psychology)
Discrimination
Stimulus
Response Bias
Signal Detection
Haptics
Experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Independence and separability of volume and mass in the size-weight illusion. / Oberle, Crystal D.; Amazeen, Eric.

In: Perception and Psychophysics, Vol. 65, No. 6, 08.2003, p. 831-843.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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