Increasing the probability of success in the first computer science course

Faye Tadayon-Navabi, Mary R. Anderson-Rowland, James Collofello, Debra L. Banks

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

It is well known that many students struggle and eventually are unsuccessful in their attempt to complete their first computer science course. At Arizona State University, the first course taken by computer science majors and a few other majors is CSE 110. CSE110 teaches first year college students basic programming principles using the Java programming language. In order to do well in this course, students need to not only have a background in basic logical thinking, but also need to know basics about using computers along with internet and File Transfer Protocol. To address this problem, a CSE110 workshop has been designed for incoming freshmen who have little or no background in computers. This paper defines the content and instruction of this workshop as well as an assessment of its effectiveness. To help ensure that future freshmen are better prepared, software development curriculum materials are being developed for use at the high school level. Two summer teacher workshops have already been held and a third is planned.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE
Volume1
StatePublished - 2004
Event34th Annual Frontiers in Education: Expanding Educational Opportunities Through Partnerships and Distance Learning - Conference Proceedings, FIE - Savannah, GA, United States
Duration: Oct 20 2004Oct 23 2004

Other

Other34th Annual Frontiers in Education: Expanding Educational Opportunities Through Partnerships and Distance Learning - Conference Proceedings, FIE
CountryUnited States
CitySavannah, GA
Period10/20/0410/23/04

Keywords

  • Introductory Computer Science Class
  • Placement Exam
  • Retention
  • Workshops

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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  • Cite this

    Tadayon-Navabi, F., Anderson-Rowland, M. R., Collofello, J., & Banks, D. L. (2004). Increasing the probability of success in the first computer science course. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE (Vol. 1)