Improved typing on a flat keyboard via tactile key-identity feedback

Sung Hun Sim, Bing Wu, Roberta L. Klatzky

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The present study investigated whether the information about key identity could be effectively delivered via tactile stimulation and if such information could be used to facilitate typing on flat virtual or real keyboards. Two sets of experiments were conducted using a flat-surface, pressure-sensitive keyboard. Participants were tested in a single-lettertyping task, in which tactile sounds were used to convey the key identity information as part of stimulus or as response feedback. The results found that while the key identity information could be conveyed through tactile sounds, an association between key identity and tactile stimulation had to be learned through training, and typing performance was facilitated by the association. The findings point to a potential strategy for using tactile key-identity feedback to improve virtual keyboard typing.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationIEEE Haptics Symposium, HAPTICS
    PublisherIEEE Computer Society
    Pages319-324
    Number of pages6
    Volume2016-April
    ISBN (Print)9781509009039
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 29 2016
    Event24th IEEE Haptics Symposium 2016, HAPTICS 2016 - Philadelphia, United States
    Duration: Apr 8 2016Apr 11 2016

    Other

    Other24th IEEE Haptics Symposium 2016, HAPTICS 2016
    CountryUnited States
    CityPhiladelphia
    Period4/8/164/11/16

    Fingerprint

    Acoustic waves
    Feedback
    Experiments

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Human-Computer Interaction

    Cite this

    Sim, S. H., Wu, B., & Klatzky, R. L. (2016). Improved typing on a flat keyboard via tactile key-identity feedback. In IEEE Haptics Symposium, HAPTICS (Vol. 2016-April, pp. 319-324). [7463196] IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/HAPTICS.2016.7463196

    Improved typing on a flat keyboard via tactile key-identity feedback. / Sim, Sung Hun; Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.

    IEEE Haptics Symposium, HAPTICS. Vol. 2016-April IEEE Computer Society, 2016. p. 319-324 7463196.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Sim, SH, Wu, B & Klatzky, RL 2016, Improved typing on a flat keyboard via tactile key-identity feedback. in IEEE Haptics Symposium, HAPTICS. vol. 2016-April, 7463196, IEEE Computer Society, pp. 319-324, 24th IEEE Haptics Symposium 2016, HAPTICS 2016, Philadelphia, United States, 4/8/16. https://doi.org/10.1109/HAPTICS.2016.7463196
    Sim SH, Wu B, Klatzky RL. Improved typing on a flat keyboard via tactile key-identity feedback. In IEEE Haptics Symposium, HAPTICS. Vol. 2016-April. IEEE Computer Society. 2016. p. 319-324. 7463196 https://doi.org/10.1109/HAPTICS.2016.7463196
    Sim, Sung Hun ; Wu, Bing ; Klatzky, Roberta L. / Improved typing on a flat keyboard via tactile key-identity feedback. IEEE Haptics Symposium, HAPTICS. Vol. 2016-April IEEE Computer Society, 2016. pp. 319-324
    @inproceedings{8d40083acd254b5fb06c7260594fa08f,
    title = "Improved typing on a flat keyboard via tactile key-identity feedback",
    abstract = "The present study investigated whether the information about key identity could be effectively delivered via tactile stimulation and if such information could be used to facilitate typing on flat virtual or real keyboards. Two sets of experiments were conducted using a flat-surface, pressure-sensitive keyboard. Participants were tested in a single-lettertyping task, in which tactile sounds were used to convey the key identity information as part of stimulus or as response feedback. The results found that while the key identity information could be conveyed through tactile sounds, an association between key identity and tactile stimulation had to be learned through training, and typing performance was facilitated by the association. The findings point to a potential strategy for using tactile key-identity feedback to improve virtual keyboard typing.",
    author = "Sim, {Sung Hun} and Bing Wu and Klatzky, {Roberta L.}",
    year = "2016",
    month = "4",
    day = "29",
    doi = "10.1109/HAPTICS.2016.7463196",
    language = "English (US)",
    isbn = "9781509009039",
    volume = "2016-April",
    pages = "319--324",
    booktitle = "IEEE Haptics Symposium, HAPTICS",
    publisher = "IEEE Computer Society",

    }

    TY - GEN

    T1 - Improved typing on a flat keyboard via tactile key-identity feedback

    AU - Sim, Sung Hun

    AU - Wu, Bing

    AU - Klatzky, Roberta L.

    PY - 2016/4/29

    Y1 - 2016/4/29

    N2 - The present study investigated whether the information about key identity could be effectively delivered via tactile stimulation and if such information could be used to facilitate typing on flat virtual or real keyboards. Two sets of experiments were conducted using a flat-surface, pressure-sensitive keyboard. Participants were tested in a single-lettertyping task, in which tactile sounds were used to convey the key identity information as part of stimulus or as response feedback. The results found that while the key identity information could be conveyed through tactile sounds, an association between key identity and tactile stimulation had to be learned through training, and typing performance was facilitated by the association. The findings point to a potential strategy for using tactile key-identity feedback to improve virtual keyboard typing.

    AB - The present study investigated whether the information about key identity could be effectively delivered via tactile stimulation and if such information could be used to facilitate typing on flat virtual or real keyboards. Two sets of experiments were conducted using a flat-surface, pressure-sensitive keyboard. Participants were tested in a single-lettertyping task, in which tactile sounds were used to convey the key identity information as part of stimulus or as response feedback. The results found that while the key identity information could be conveyed through tactile sounds, an association between key identity and tactile stimulation had to be learned through training, and typing performance was facilitated by the association. The findings point to a potential strategy for using tactile key-identity feedback to improve virtual keyboard typing.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84967261496&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84967261496&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1109/HAPTICS.2016.7463196

    DO - 10.1109/HAPTICS.2016.7463196

    M3 - Conference contribution

    SN - 9781509009039

    VL - 2016-April

    SP - 319

    EP - 324

    BT - IEEE Haptics Symposium, HAPTICS

    PB - IEEE Computer Society

    ER -