Human rights: The U.S.-Mexico experience

William Paul Simmons, Carol Mueller

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

Mexico ranks highly on many of the measures that have proven significant for creating a positive human rights record, including democratization, good health and life expectancy, and engagement in the global economy. Yet the nation's most vulnerable populations suffer human rights abuses on a large scale, such as gruesome killings in the Mexican drug war, decades of violent feminicide, migrant deaths in the U.S. desert, and the ongoing effects of the failed detention and deportation system in the States. Some atrocities have received extensive and sensational coverage, while others have become routine or simply ignored by national and international media. Binational Human Rights examines both well-known and understudied instances of human rights crises in Mexico, arguing that these abuses must be understood not just within the context of Mexican policies but in relation to the actions or inactions of other nations—particularly the United States. The United States and Mexico share the longest border in the world between a developed and a developing nation; the relationship between the two nations is complex, varied, and constantly changing, but the policies of each directly affect the human rights situation across the border. Binational Human Rights brings together explain the mechanisms by which a perfect storm of structural and policy factors on both sides has led to such widespread human rights abuses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherUniversity of Pennsylvania Press
Number of pages300
ISBN (Print)9780812209983, 9780812246285
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

human rights
Mexico
experience
abuse
deportation
life expectancy
desert
democratization
migrant
coverage
drug
death
economy
health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Simmons, W. P., & Mueller, C. (2014). Human rights: The U.S.-Mexico experience. University of Pennsylvania Press.

Human rights : The U.S.-Mexico experience. / Simmons, William Paul; Mueller, Carol.

University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014. 300 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Simmons, WP & Mueller, C 2014, Human rights: The U.S.-Mexico experience. University of Pennsylvania Press.
Simmons WP, Mueller C. Human rights: The U.S.-Mexico experience. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014. 300 p.
Simmons, William Paul ; Mueller, Carol. / Human rights : The U.S.-Mexico experience. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014. 300 p.
@book{5d7a361581574740a553e823b7df9c5d,
title = "Human rights: The U.S.-Mexico experience",
abstract = "Mexico ranks highly on many of the measures that have proven significant for creating a positive human rights record, including democratization, good health and life expectancy, and engagement in the global economy. Yet the nation's most vulnerable populations suffer human rights abuses on a large scale, such as gruesome killings in the Mexican drug war, decades of violent feminicide, migrant deaths in the U.S. desert, and the ongoing effects of the failed detention and deportation system in the States. Some atrocities have received extensive and sensational coverage, while others have become routine or simply ignored by national and international media. Binational Human Rights examines both well-known and understudied instances of human rights crises in Mexico, arguing that these abuses must be understood not just within the context of Mexican policies but in relation to the actions or inactions of other nations—particularly the United States. The United States and Mexico share the longest border in the world between a developed and a developing nation; the relationship between the two nations is complex, varied, and constantly changing, but the policies of each directly affect the human rights situation across the border. Binational Human Rights brings together explain the mechanisms by which a perfect storm of structural and policy factors on both sides has led to such widespread human rights abuses.",
author = "Simmons, {William Paul} and Carol Mueller",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780812209983",
publisher = "University of Pennsylvania Press",

}

TY - BOOK

T1 - Human rights

T2 - The U.S.-Mexico experience

AU - Simmons, William Paul

AU - Mueller, Carol

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Mexico ranks highly on many of the measures that have proven significant for creating a positive human rights record, including democratization, good health and life expectancy, and engagement in the global economy. Yet the nation's most vulnerable populations suffer human rights abuses on a large scale, such as gruesome killings in the Mexican drug war, decades of violent feminicide, migrant deaths in the U.S. desert, and the ongoing effects of the failed detention and deportation system in the States. Some atrocities have received extensive and sensational coverage, while others have become routine or simply ignored by national and international media. Binational Human Rights examines both well-known and understudied instances of human rights crises in Mexico, arguing that these abuses must be understood not just within the context of Mexican policies but in relation to the actions or inactions of other nations—particularly the United States. The United States and Mexico share the longest border in the world between a developed and a developing nation; the relationship between the two nations is complex, varied, and constantly changing, but the policies of each directly affect the human rights situation across the border. Binational Human Rights brings together explain the mechanisms by which a perfect storm of structural and policy factors on both sides has led to such widespread human rights abuses.

AB - Mexico ranks highly on many of the measures that have proven significant for creating a positive human rights record, including democratization, good health and life expectancy, and engagement in the global economy. Yet the nation's most vulnerable populations suffer human rights abuses on a large scale, such as gruesome killings in the Mexican drug war, decades of violent feminicide, migrant deaths in the U.S. desert, and the ongoing effects of the failed detention and deportation system in the States. Some atrocities have received extensive and sensational coverage, while others have become routine or simply ignored by national and international media. Binational Human Rights examines both well-known and understudied instances of human rights crises in Mexico, arguing that these abuses must be understood not just within the context of Mexican policies but in relation to the actions or inactions of other nations—particularly the United States. The United States and Mexico share the longest border in the world between a developed and a developing nation; the relationship between the two nations is complex, varied, and constantly changing, but the policies of each directly affect the human rights situation across the border. Binational Human Rights brings together explain the mechanisms by which a perfect storm of structural and policy factors on both sides has led to such widespread human rights abuses.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84942886307&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84942886307&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Book

AN - SCOPUS:84942886307

SN - 9780812209983

SN - 9780812246285

BT - Human rights

PB - University of Pennsylvania Press

ER -