How Is Public Service Motivation Affected by Regulatory Policy Changes?

Ulrich Jensen, Anne Mette Kjeldsen, Christian Fischer Vestergaard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Policies changing the conditions for frontline public service providers are frequent. However, we know little about whether and in what ways such policies feed back to the attitudes and motivation of the personnel. This article examines how a specific regulatory policy change involving a restriction on work conditions affected Danish general medical practitioners’ (GPs) public service motivation (PSM). Using a three-wave survey panel in which the regulatory policy change occurred between the first two rounds of data collection, we find both short-term and long-term effects on the GPs’ PSM. Specifically, the GPs experienced a lasting decline in this type of motivation following the regulation. However, this was only with respect to their level of attraction to policymaking, public interest, and self-sacrifice, whereas their level of compassion increased in the short term. Results indicate that regulatory policies constraining the work conditions of frontline public service providers can indeed produce lasting negative motivational effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Public Management Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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regulatory policy
public service
service provider
public interest
personnel
regulation
Policy change
Regulatory policy
Public service motivation
Service provider
Public services
Work conditions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Public Administration

Cite this

How Is Public Service Motivation Affected by Regulatory Policy Changes? / Jensen, Ulrich; Kjeldsen, Anne Mette; Vestergaard, Christian Fischer.

In: International Public Management Journal, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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