How a participatory process with inclusive structural design allocates resources toward poor neighborhoods: the case of participatory budgeting in Seoul, South Korea

Won No, Lily Hsueh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between inclusiveness with respect to the structural design of the participatory process and resource allocation outcomes in participatory budgeting. Empirically, this article examines the case of participatory budgeting in Seoul, South Korea, where redistribution is not an explicit goal. Findings suggest that creating organizational structures that enable and encourage public participation has led Seoul’s participatory budgeting to distribute public funds toward poor neighborhoods. Points for practitioners: Participatory budgeting is an exemplar practice of public participation in the government decision-making process. It is a local budgeting practice that allows the public to participate, discuss, deliberate, and decide where and how to spend public money. This study highlights the importance of designing inclusive organizational structures in participatory budgeting to encourage public participation. Empirical results underscore the link between inclusive organizational structures and more equitable allocation outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Review of Administrative Sciences
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • administration and democracy
  • citizen participation
  • inclusiveness
  • participatory budgeting
  • public management
  • redistribution
  • social equity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

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