High-stakes accountability and equity: Using evidence from California's public schools accountability act to address the issues in Williams v. State of California

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

In May 2000, a class action lawsuit on behalf of California's public school students, Williams v. State of California, was filed in state court in an effort to make the state address inequities in its public schools. The central issue of the case was students' access to the "bare essentials" of public education: qualified teachers, current textbooks, and adequate and safe facilities. The author analyzes the relationship between school and district characteristics and the base year of the Academic Performance Index (API), the state's main measure of school performance, focusing on variables related to the main issues in the Williams case. The findings support the plaintiffs' arguments that the basic educational necessities targeted by the case should be the object of state policy in conjunction with accountability policies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)763-795
Number of pages33
JournalAmerican Educational Research Journal
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Keywords

  • Accountability
  • Equity
  • School-finance litigation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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