High spontaneous rate of gene duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans

Kendra J. Lipinski, James C. Farslow, Kelly A. Fitzpatrick, Michael Lynch, Vaishali Katju, Ulfar Bergthorsson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gene and genome duplications are the primary source of new genes and novel functions and have played a pivotal role in the evolution of genomic and organismal complexity [1, 2]. The spontaneous rate of gene duplication is a critical parameter for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of gene duplicates; yet few direct empirical estimates exist and differ widely. The presence of a large population of recently derived gene duplicates in sequenced genomes suggests a high rate of spontaneous origin, also evidenced by population genomic studies reporting rampant copy-number polymorphism at the intraspecific level [3-6]. An analysis of long-term mutation accumulation lines of Caenorhabditis elegans for gene copy-number changes with array comparative genomic hybridization yields the first direct estimate of the genome-wide rate of gene duplication in a multicellular eukaryote. The gene duplication rate in C. elegans is quite high, on the order of 10-7 duplications/gene/ generation. This rate is two orders of magnitude greater than the spontaneous rate of point mutation per nucleotide site in this species and also greatly exceeds an earlier estimate derived from the frequency distribution of extant gene duplicates in the sequenced C. elegans genome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-310
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 22 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gene Duplication
Caenorhabditis elegans
gene duplication
duplicate genes
Duplicate Genes
Genes
genome
Genome
comparative genomic hybridization
gene dosage
DNA Copy Number Variations
point mutation
Metagenomics
Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Gene Dosage
eukaryotic cells
Eukaryota
genes
Point Mutation
nucleotides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Lipinski, K. J., Farslow, J. C., Fitzpatrick, K. A., Lynch, M., Katju, V., & Bergthorsson, U. (2011). High spontaneous rate of gene duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans. Current Biology, 21(4), 306-310. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2011.01.026

High spontaneous rate of gene duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans. / Lipinski, Kendra J.; Farslow, James C.; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A.; Lynch, Michael; Katju, Vaishali; Bergthorsson, Ulfar.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 21, No. 4, 22.02.2011, p. 306-310.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lipinski, KJ, Farslow, JC, Fitzpatrick, KA, Lynch, M, Katju, V & Bergthorsson, U 2011, 'High spontaneous rate of gene duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans', Current Biology, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 306-310. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2011.01.026
Lipinski KJ, Farslow JC, Fitzpatrick KA, Lynch M, Katju V, Bergthorsson U. High spontaneous rate of gene duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans. Current Biology. 2011 Feb 22;21(4):306-310. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2011.01.026
Lipinski, Kendra J. ; Farslow, James C. ; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A. ; Lynch, Michael ; Katju, Vaishali ; Bergthorsson, Ulfar. / High spontaneous rate of gene duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans. In: Current Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 306-310.
@article{1db5b2ac4fd74369b1a4e96bf07a2ba6,
title = "High spontaneous rate of gene duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans",
abstract = "Gene and genome duplications are the primary source of new genes and novel functions and have played a pivotal role in the evolution of genomic and organismal complexity [1, 2]. The spontaneous rate of gene duplication is a critical parameter for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of gene duplicates; yet few direct empirical estimates exist and differ widely. The presence of a large population of recently derived gene duplicates in sequenced genomes suggests a high rate of spontaneous origin, also evidenced by population genomic studies reporting rampant copy-number polymorphism at the intraspecific level [3-6]. An analysis of long-term mutation accumulation lines of Caenorhabditis elegans for gene copy-number changes with array comparative genomic hybridization yields the first direct estimate of the genome-wide rate of gene duplication in a multicellular eukaryote. The gene duplication rate in C. elegans is quite high, on the order of 10-7 duplications/gene/ generation. This rate is two orders of magnitude greater than the spontaneous rate of point mutation per nucleotide site in this species and also greatly exceeds an earlier estimate derived from the frequency distribution of extant gene duplicates in the sequenced C. elegans genome.",
author = "Lipinski, {Kendra J.} and Farslow, {James C.} and Fitzpatrick, {Kelly A.} and Michael Lynch and Vaishali Katju and Ulfar Bergthorsson",
year = "2011",
month = "2",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1016/j.cub.2011.01.026",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "306--310",
journal = "Current Biology",
issn = "0960-9822",
publisher = "Cell Press",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - High spontaneous rate of gene duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans

AU - Lipinski, Kendra J.

AU - Farslow, James C.

AU - Fitzpatrick, Kelly A.

AU - Lynch, Michael

AU - Katju, Vaishali

AU - Bergthorsson, Ulfar

PY - 2011/2/22

Y1 - 2011/2/22

N2 - Gene and genome duplications are the primary source of new genes and novel functions and have played a pivotal role in the evolution of genomic and organismal complexity [1, 2]. The spontaneous rate of gene duplication is a critical parameter for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of gene duplicates; yet few direct empirical estimates exist and differ widely. The presence of a large population of recently derived gene duplicates in sequenced genomes suggests a high rate of spontaneous origin, also evidenced by population genomic studies reporting rampant copy-number polymorphism at the intraspecific level [3-6]. An analysis of long-term mutation accumulation lines of Caenorhabditis elegans for gene copy-number changes with array comparative genomic hybridization yields the first direct estimate of the genome-wide rate of gene duplication in a multicellular eukaryote. The gene duplication rate in C. elegans is quite high, on the order of 10-7 duplications/gene/ generation. This rate is two orders of magnitude greater than the spontaneous rate of point mutation per nucleotide site in this species and also greatly exceeds an earlier estimate derived from the frequency distribution of extant gene duplicates in the sequenced C. elegans genome.

AB - Gene and genome duplications are the primary source of new genes and novel functions and have played a pivotal role in the evolution of genomic and organismal complexity [1, 2]. The spontaneous rate of gene duplication is a critical parameter for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of gene duplicates; yet few direct empirical estimates exist and differ widely. The presence of a large population of recently derived gene duplicates in sequenced genomes suggests a high rate of spontaneous origin, also evidenced by population genomic studies reporting rampant copy-number polymorphism at the intraspecific level [3-6]. An analysis of long-term mutation accumulation lines of Caenorhabditis elegans for gene copy-number changes with array comparative genomic hybridization yields the first direct estimate of the genome-wide rate of gene duplication in a multicellular eukaryote. The gene duplication rate in C. elegans is quite high, on the order of 10-7 duplications/gene/ generation. This rate is two orders of magnitude greater than the spontaneous rate of point mutation per nucleotide site in this species and also greatly exceeds an earlier estimate derived from the frequency distribution of extant gene duplicates in the sequenced C. elegans genome.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79951773479&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79951773479&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cub.2011.01.026

DO - 10.1016/j.cub.2011.01.026

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 306

EP - 310

JO - Current Biology

JF - Current Biology

SN - 0960-9822

IS - 4

ER -