High risk channeling to improve Medicaid maternal and infant care

S. L. Baker, J. J. Kronenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

To improve the medical care access of the poorest women and newborns, South Carolina began a High Risk Channeling Project since April 1986. The Project directs physicians to screen all Medicaid-eligible pregnant women and newborns for specified clinical high risk factors. High risk patients are channeled to designated clinics for prenatal and newborn care. Channeled pregnant women are directed to deliver their babies at regional referral hospitals. For the first two years of the Project, about two-thirds of pregnancies and 60% of newborns were actually screened. Channeled women were much more likely than the non-channeled to deliver at higher level hospitals. In counties where relatively few women were channeled, the rate of prematurity among Medicaid newborns was significantly higher than in other counties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-49
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Health and Social Policy
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Infant Care
Medicaid
infant
Mothers
Newborn Infant
Pregnant Women
Prenatal Care
risk factor
pregnancy
baby
medical care
Referral and Consultation
physician
channelling
woman
Physicians
Pregnancy
project

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

High risk channeling to improve Medicaid maternal and infant care. / Baker, S. L.; Kronenfeld, J. J.

In: Journal of Health and Social Policy, Vol. 3, No. 4, 1992, p. 29-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baker, S. L. ; Kronenfeld, J. J. / High risk channeling to improve Medicaid maternal and infant care. In: Journal of Health and Social Policy. 1992 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 29-49.
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