High Prevalence of Undiagnosed Hyperglycemia in Low-Income Overweight and Obese Hispanic Women in Oregon

Nangel M. Lindberg, Sonia Vega-Lopez, Erin S. LeBlanc, Michael C. Leo, Victor J. Stevens, Sara Gille, Mayra Arias-Gastélum, Elizabeth Shuster, Richard Meenan, Katherine A. Vaughn, Meagan C. Shaw, Ann Turner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Overweight Hispanic women are at high risk for type 2 diabetes. A clinical diagnosis of hyperglycemia is often necessary to access interventions. We examined the prevalence of undiagnosed hyperglycemia among a group of low-income overweight or obese Hispanic women, who were receiving care at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). Methods: Among 196 overweight or obese Hispanic women (mean age 44 ± 10 years, mean weight 86.8 ± 16.5 kg, mean body mass index [BMI] 36.5 ± 6.4 kg/m 2 ) enrolled in a randomized clinical weight-loss trial, we compared A1C and fasting blood glucose (FBG) obtained at baseline with women’s existing diabetes and prediabetes diagnoses in the medical record. Results: According to the information in participants’ medical records, 36% (70/196) had diagnosed diabetes, 20% (39/196) had a diagnosis of prediabetes, and the remaining 44% (87/196) had neither diagnosis. Among participants without a diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes during the baseline screening for our study, 63% (55/87) had at least one test in the prediabetes range (baseline A1C and FBG were in prediabetes range for 39 and 55 participants, respectively), and 13% (11/87) had at least one test in the diabetic range (baseline A1C and FBG values in diabetes range for 3 and 11 participants, respectively). Discussion: We found substantial prevalence of undiagnosed hyperglycemia among a sample of overweight and obese Hispanic women. It is possible that limited awareness of diabetes risk may be a barrier to patient compliance with screening recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Prediabetic State
Hispanic Americans
Hyperglycemia
chronic illness
low income
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Medical Records
Patient Compliance
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Weight Loss
Body Mass Index
Weights and Measures
Health
health
Values

Keywords

  • Diagnosis
  • Hispanic
  • Hyperglycemia
  • Underdiagnosis
  • Women’s health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

High Prevalence of Undiagnosed Hyperglycemia in Low-Income Overweight and Obese Hispanic Women in Oregon. / Lindberg, Nangel M.; Vega-Lopez, Sonia; LeBlanc, Erin S.; Leo, Michael C.; Stevens, Victor J.; Gille, Sara; Arias-Gastélum, Mayra; Shuster, Elizabeth; Meenan, Richard; Vaughn, Katherine A.; Shaw, Meagan C.; Turner, Ann.

In: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lindberg, NM, Vega-Lopez, S, LeBlanc, ES, Leo, MC, Stevens, VJ, Gille, S, Arias-Gastélum, M, Shuster, E, Meenan, R, Vaughn, KA, Shaw, MC & Turner, A 2019, 'High Prevalence of Undiagnosed Hyperglycemia in Low-Income Overweight and Obese Hispanic Women in Oregon', Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-019-00578-9
Lindberg, Nangel M. ; Vega-Lopez, Sonia ; LeBlanc, Erin S. ; Leo, Michael C. ; Stevens, Victor J. ; Gille, Sara ; Arias-Gastélum, Mayra ; Shuster, Elizabeth ; Meenan, Richard ; Vaughn, Katherine A. ; Shaw, Meagan C. ; Turner, Ann. / High Prevalence of Undiagnosed Hyperglycemia in Low-Income Overweight and Obese Hispanic Women in Oregon. In: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. 2019.
@article{e2883567cbb74a87afe26922e2c4e4b5,
title = "High Prevalence of Undiagnosed Hyperglycemia in Low-Income Overweight and Obese Hispanic Women in Oregon",
abstract = "Background: Overweight Hispanic women are at high risk for type 2 diabetes. A clinical diagnosis of hyperglycemia is often necessary to access interventions. We examined the prevalence of undiagnosed hyperglycemia among a group of low-income overweight or obese Hispanic women, who were receiving care at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). Methods: Among 196 overweight or obese Hispanic women (mean age 44 ± 10 years, mean weight 86.8 ± 16.5 kg, mean body mass index [BMI] 36.5 ± 6.4 kg/m 2 ) enrolled in a randomized clinical weight-loss trial, we compared A1C and fasting blood glucose (FBG) obtained at baseline with women’s existing diabetes and prediabetes diagnoses in the medical record. Results: According to the information in participants’ medical records, 36{\%} (70/196) had diagnosed diabetes, 20{\%} (39/196) had a diagnosis of prediabetes, and the remaining 44{\%} (87/196) had neither diagnosis. Among participants without a diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes during the baseline screening for our study, 63{\%} (55/87) had at least one test in the prediabetes range (baseline A1C and FBG were in prediabetes range for 39 and 55 participants, respectively), and 13{\%} (11/87) had at least one test in the diabetic range (baseline A1C and FBG values in diabetes range for 3 and 11 participants, respectively). Discussion: We found substantial prevalence of undiagnosed hyperglycemia among a sample of overweight and obese Hispanic women. It is possible that limited awareness of diabetes risk may be a barrier to patient compliance with screening recommendations.",
keywords = "Diagnosis, Hispanic, Hyperglycemia, Underdiagnosis, Women’s health",
author = "Lindberg, {Nangel M.} and Sonia Vega-Lopez and LeBlanc, {Erin S.} and Leo, {Michael C.} and Stevens, {Victor J.} and Sara Gille and Mayra Arias-Gast{\'e}lum and Elizabeth Shuster and Richard Meenan and Vaughn, {Katherine A.} and Shaw, {Meagan C.} and Ann Turner",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s40615-019-00578-9",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities",
issn = "2197-3792",
publisher = "Springer Nature",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - High Prevalence of Undiagnosed Hyperglycemia in Low-Income Overweight and Obese Hispanic Women in Oregon

AU - Lindberg, Nangel M.

AU - Vega-Lopez, Sonia

AU - LeBlanc, Erin S.

AU - Leo, Michael C.

AU - Stevens, Victor J.

AU - Gille, Sara

AU - Arias-Gastélum, Mayra

AU - Shuster, Elizabeth

AU - Meenan, Richard

AU - Vaughn, Katherine A.

AU - Shaw, Meagan C.

AU - Turner, Ann

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Overweight Hispanic women are at high risk for type 2 diabetes. A clinical diagnosis of hyperglycemia is often necessary to access interventions. We examined the prevalence of undiagnosed hyperglycemia among a group of low-income overweight or obese Hispanic women, who were receiving care at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). Methods: Among 196 overweight or obese Hispanic women (mean age 44 ± 10 years, mean weight 86.8 ± 16.5 kg, mean body mass index [BMI] 36.5 ± 6.4 kg/m 2 ) enrolled in a randomized clinical weight-loss trial, we compared A1C and fasting blood glucose (FBG) obtained at baseline with women’s existing diabetes and prediabetes diagnoses in the medical record. Results: According to the information in participants’ medical records, 36% (70/196) had diagnosed diabetes, 20% (39/196) had a diagnosis of prediabetes, and the remaining 44% (87/196) had neither diagnosis. Among participants without a diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes during the baseline screening for our study, 63% (55/87) had at least one test in the prediabetes range (baseline A1C and FBG were in prediabetes range for 39 and 55 participants, respectively), and 13% (11/87) had at least one test in the diabetic range (baseline A1C and FBG values in diabetes range for 3 and 11 participants, respectively). Discussion: We found substantial prevalence of undiagnosed hyperglycemia among a sample of overweight and obese Hispanic women. It is possible that limited awareness of diabetes risk may be a barrier to patient compliance with screening recommendations.

AB - Background: Overweight Hispanic women are at high risk for type 2 diabetes. A clinical diagnosis of hyperglycemia is often necessary to access interventions. We examined the prevalence of undiagnosed hyperglycemia among a group of low-income overweight or obese Hispanic women, who were receiving care at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). Methods: Among 196 overweight or obese Hispanic women (mean age 44 ± 10 years, mean weight 86.8 ± 16.5 kg, mean body mass index [BMI] 36.5 ± 6.4 kg/m 2 ) enrolled in a randomized clinical weight-loss trial, we compared A1C and fasting blood glucose (FBG) obtained at baseline with women’s existing diabetes and prediabetes diagnoses in the medical record. Results: According to the information in participants’ medical records, 36% (70/196) had diagnosed diabetes, 20% (39/196) had a diagnosis of prediabetes, and the remaining 44% (87/196) had neither diagnosis. Among participants without a diagnosis of diabetes or prediabetes during the baseline screening for our study, 63% (55/87) had at least one test in the prediabetes range (baseline A1C and FBG were in prediabetes range for 39 and 55 participants, respectively), and 13% (11/87) had at least one test in the diabetic range (baseline A1C and FBG values in diabetes range for 3 and 11 participants, respectively). Discussion: We found substantial prevalence of undiagnosed hyperglycemia among a sample of overweight and obese Hispanic women. It is possible that limited awareness of diabetes risk may be a barrier to patient compliance with screening recommendations.

KW - Diagnosis

KW - Hispanic

KW - Hyperglycemia

KW - Underdiagnosis

KW - Women’s health

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062852208&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85062852208&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s40615-019-00578-9

DO - 10.1007/s40615-019-00578-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 30859515

AN - SCOPUS:85062852208

JO - Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities

JF - Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities

SN - 2197-3792

ER -