Heterogeneity of Hepatitis B Infection Among Pregnant Asian American and Pacific Islander Women

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders is a key driver of racial health disparities in liver cancer and mortality in the U.S. This study documents the prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women across racial/ethnic groups and among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to assess the need for intervention, and then identifies the individual correlates of hepatitis B virus infection among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women. Methods: Using the 2014–2015U.S. birth rate population data, this study estimates a series of logistic regression models to examine the associations between individual-level correlates and hepatitis B virus infection among Asian American and Pacific Islanders pregnant women. Data were analyzed in July 2017. Results: Among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women, Chinese American mothers are ten times more likely to experience hepatitis B virus infection than are Asian Indian and Japanese American mothers. Foreign-born mothers are significantly more likely to experience hepatitis B virus infection during pregnancy than those of their U.S.-born counterparts. Maternal SES characteristics are important correlates of hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women. Conclusions: Studies must disaggregate the pan-ethnic Asian American and Pacific Islander category to examine the health and health disparities of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Given the heterogeneity of hepatitis B virus infection prevalence among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women, the effectiveness of prevention and intervention programs depends on careful consideration of ethnicity in conjunction with group-specific factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-221
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Fingerprint

Asian Americans
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis B virus
Virus Diseases
Infection
Pregnant Women
Mothers
Health
Logistic Models
Birth Rate
Liver Neoplasms
Ethnic Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Heterogeneity of Hepatitis B Infection Among Pregnant Asian American and Pacific Islander Women. / Noah, Aggie.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 55, No. 2, 01.08.2018, p. 213-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{60224318204b4582b1ef77a0f8924323,
title = "Heterogeneity of Hepatitis B Infection Among Pregnant Asian American and Pacific Islander Women",
abstract = "Introduction: Perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders is a key driver of racial health disparities in liver cancer and mortality in the U.S. This study documents the prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women across racial/ethnic groups and among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to assess the need for intervention, and then identifies the individual correlates of hepatitis B virus infection among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women. Methods: Using the 2014–2015U.S. birth rate population data, this study estimates a series of logistic regression models to examine the associations between individual-level correlates and hepatitis B virus infection among Asian American and Pacific Islanders pregnant women. Data were analyzed in July 2017. Results: Among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women, Chinese American mothers are ten times more likely to experience hepatitis B virus infection than are Asian Indian and Japanese American mothers. Foreign-born mothers are significantly more likely to experience hepatitis B virus infection during pregnancy than those of their U.S.-born counterparts. Maternal SES characteristics are important correlates of hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women. Conclusions: Studies must disaggregate the pan-ethnic Asian American and Pacific Islander category to examine the health and health disparities of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Given the heterogeneity of hepatitis B virus infection prevalence among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women, the effectiveness of prevention and intervention programs depends on careful consideration of ethnicity in conjunction with group-specific factors.",
author = "Aggie Noah",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amepre.2018.03.021",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "213--221",
journal = "American Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0749-3797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heterogeneity of Hepatitis B Infection Among Pregnant Asian American and Pacific Islander Women

AU - Noah, Aggie

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - Introduction: Perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders is a key driver of racial health disparities in liver cancer and mortality in the U.S. This study documents the prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women across racial/ethnic groups and among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to assess the need for intervention, and then identifies the individual correlates of hepatitis B virus infection among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women. Methods: Using the 2014–2015U.S. birth rate population data, this study estimates a series of logistic regression models to examine the associations between individual-level correlates and hepatitis B virus infection among Asian American and Pacific Islanders pregnant women. Data were analyzed in July 2017. Results: Among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women, Chinese American mothers are ten times more likely to experience hepatitis B virus infection than are Asian Indian and Japanese American mothers. Foreign-born mothers are significantly more likely to experience hepatitis B virus infection during pregnancy than those of their U.S.-born counterparts. Maternal SES characteristics are important correlates of hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women. Conclusions: Studies must disaggregate the pan-ethnic Asian American and Pacific Islander category to examine the health and health disparities of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Given the heterogeneity of hepatitis B virus infection prevalence among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women, the effectiveness of prevention and intervention programs depends on careful consideration of ethnicity in conjunction with group-specific factors.

AB - Introduction: Perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders is a key driver of racial health disparities in liver cancer and mortality in the U.S. This study documents the prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women across racial/ethnic groups and among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to assess the need for intervention, and then identifies the individual correlates of hepatitis B virus infection among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women. Methods: Using the 2014–2015U.S. birth rate population data, this study estimates a series of logistic regression models to examine the associations between individual-level correlates and hepatitis B virus infection among Asian American and Pacific Islanders pregnant women. Data were analyzed in July 2017. Results: Among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women, Chinese American mothers are ten times more likely to experience hepatitis B virus infection than are Asian Indian and Japanese American mothers. Foreign-born mothers are significantly more likely to experience hepatitis B virus infection during pregnancy than those of their U.S.-born counterparts. Maternal SES characteristics are important correlates of hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women. Conclusions: Studies must disaggregate the pan-ethnic Asian American and Pacific Islander category to examine the health and health disparities of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Given the heterogeneity of hepatitis B virus infection prevalence among Asian American and Pacific Islander pregnant women, the effectiveness of prevention and intervention programs depends on careful consideration of ethnicity in conjunction with group-specific factors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049747466&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85049747466&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amepre.2018.03.021

DO - 10.1016/j.amepre.2018.03.021

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 213

EP - 221

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 2

ER -