He Said What? Guided Cognitive Reframing About the Co-Resident Father/Stepfather-Adolescent Relationship

Jeffrey T. Cookston, Andres Olide, Ross D. Parke, William Fabricius, Delia Saenz, Sanford L. Braver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We studied young adolescents' seeking out support to understand conflict with their co-resident fathers/stepfathers, and the cognitive and affective implications of such support-seeking, phenomena we call guided cognitive reframing. Our sample included 392 adolescents (Mage = 12.5, 52.3% female) who were either of Mexican or European ancestry and lived with their biological mothers and either a stepfather or a biological father. More frequent reframing was associated with more adaptive cognitive explanations for father/stepfather behavior. Cognitions explained the link between seeking out and feelings about the father/stepfather and self. Feelings about the self were more strongly linked to depressive symptoms than cognitions. We discuss the implications for future research on social support, coping, guided cognitive reframing, and father-child relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-278
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'He Said What? Guided Cognitive Reframing About the Co-Resident Father/Stepfather-Adolescent Relationship'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this