Graduate Training in Statistics, Methodology, and Measurement in Psychology: A Survey of PhD Programs in North America

Leona S. Aiken, Stephen West, Lee Sechrest, Raymond R. Reno, Henry L. Roediger, Sandra Scarr, Alan E. Kazdin, Steven J. Sherman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

143 Scopus citations

Abstract

A survey of all PhD programs in psychology in the United States and Canada assessed the extent to which advances in statistics, measurement, and methodology have been incorporated into doctoral training. In all, 84% of the 222 departments responded. The statistical and methodological curriculum has advanced little in 20 years; measurement has experienced a substantial decline. Typical first-year courses serve well only those students who undertake traditional laboratory research. Training in top-ranked schools differs little from that in other schools. New PhDs are judged to be competent to handle traditional techniques, but not newer and often more useful procedures, in their own research. Proposed remedies for these deficiencies include revamping the basic required quantitative and methodological curriculum, culling available training opportunities across campus, and training students in more informal settings, along with providing retraining opportunities for faculty. These strategies also require psychology to attend carefully to the human capital needs that support high-quality quantitative and methodological training and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)721-734
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Psychologist
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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    Aiken, L. S., West, S., Sechrest, L., Reno, R. R., Roediger, H. L., Scarr, S., Kazdin, A. E., & Sherman, S. J. (1990). Graduate Training in Statistics, Methodology, and Measurement in Psychology: A Survey of PhD Programs in North America. American Psychologist, 45(6), 721-734. https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.45.6.721