Getting the basics right. Care delivery in nursing homes.

Marilyn J. Rantz, Victoria Grando, Vicki Conn, Mary Zwygart-Staffacher, Lanis Hicks, Marcia Flesner, Jill Scott, Pam Manion, Donna Minner, Rose Porter, Meridean Maas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, the key exemplar processes of care in facilities with good resident outcomes were described. It follows that with description of these processes, it is feasible to teach facilities about the basics of care and the ways to systematically approach care so they can adopt these care processes and improve resident outcomes. However, for this to happen key organizational commitments must be in place for staff to consistently provide the basics of care. Nursing leadership must have a consistent presence over time, they must be champions of using team and group processes involving staff throughout the facility, and they must actively guide quality improvement processes. Administrative leadership must be present and express the expectation that high quality care is expected for residents, and that workers are expected to contribute to the quality improvement effort. If facilities are struggling with achieving average or poor resident outcomes, they must first make an effort to find nursing and administrative leaders who are willing to stay with the organization. These leaders must be skilled with team and group processes for decision-making and how to implement and use a quality improvement program to improve care. These leaders must be skilled at building employee relations and at retention strategies so residents are cared for by consistent staff who know them. The results of this study illustrate the simplicity of the basics of care that residents in nursing facilities need. The results also illustrate the complexity of the care processes and the organizational systems that must be in place to achieve good outcomes. Achieving these outcomes is the challenge facing those currently working in and leading nursing facilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-25
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Gerontological Nursing
Volume29
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Nursing Homes
Nursing
Quality Improvement
Group Processes
Quality of Health Care
Decision Making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology

Cite this

Rantz, M. J., Grando, V., Conn, V., Zwygart-Staffacher, M., Hicks, L., Flesner, M., ... Maas, M. (2003). Getting the basics right. Care delivery in nursing homes. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 29(11), 15-25.

Getting the basics right. Care delivery in nursing homes. / Rantz, Marilyn J.; Grando, Victoria; Conn, Vicki; Zwygart-Staffacher, Mary; Hicks, Lanis; Flesner, Marcia; Scott, Jill; Manion, Pam; Minner, Donna; Porter, Rose; Maas, Meridean.

In: Journal of Gerontological Nursing, Vol. 29, No. 11, 11.2003, p. 15-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rantz, MJ, Grando, V, Conn, V, Zwygart-Staffacher, M, Hicks, L, Flesner, M, Scott, J, Manion, P, Minner, D, Porter, R & Maas, M 2003, 'Getting the basics right. Care delivery in nursing homes.', Journal of Gerontological Nursing, vol. 29, no. 11, pp. 15-25.
Rantz MJ, Grando V, Conn V, Zwygart-Staffacher M, Hicks L, Flesner M et al. Getting the basics right. Care delivery in nursing homes. Journal of Gerontological Nursing. 2003 Nov;29(11):15-25.
Rantz, Marilyn J. ; Grando, Victoria ; Conn, Vicki ; Zwygart-Staffacher, Mary ; Hicks, Lanis ; Flesner, Marcia ; Scott, Jill ; Manion, Pam ; Minner, Donna ; Porter, Rose ; Maas, Meridean. / Getting the basics right. Care delivery in nursing homes. In: Journal of Gerontological Nursing. 2003 ; Vol. 29, No. 11. pp. 15-25.
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