Fostering conceptual change and critical reasoning about HIV and AIDS

Alla Keselman, David Kaufman, Sharon Kramer, Vimla Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the challenges of science education is for students to develop scientific knowledge that is personally meaningful and applicable to real-life issues. This article describes a middle-school science intervention fostering adolescents' critical reasoning in the context of HIV by strengthening their conceptual understanding of HIV biology. The intervention included two components: critical reasoning activities that fostered knowledge integration and application to real-world problem solving, and science writing activities that promoted argument building. Two seventh-grade classes participated in the study. One class participated in the critical reasoning and writing activities (CR&W); the other class participated in critical reasoning activities only (CR group). Results demonstrate significant pre- and posttest improvements on measures of students' HIV knowledge, HIV understanding, and critical reasoning about realistic scenarios in the context of HIV, with the improvements being greater in the CR&W group. The discussion focuses on the role of conceptual knowledge in health reasoning, the role of science writing in fostering knowledge integration, and the benefits of a "thinking curriculum" approach to integrated health and science education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)844-863
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Research in Science Teaching
Volume44
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

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AIDS
Education
Health
Students
science
Curricula
knowledge
health
biology
education
Group
student
scenario
adolescent
curriculum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Fostering conceptual change and critical reasoning about HIV and AIDS. / Keselman, Alla; Kaufman, David; Kramer, Sharon; Patel, Vimla.

In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, Vol. 44, No. 6, 2007, p. 844-863.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keselman, Alla ; Kaufman, David ; Kramer, Sharon ; Patel, Vimla. / Fostering conceptual change and critical reasoning about HIV and AIDS. In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 2007 ; Vol. 44, No. 6. pp. 844-863.
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