Feeling economically dependent on one's job: Its origins and functions with regard to worker well-being

Arthur P. Brief, Daphna Raskas, Joan F. Brett, Emily Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The origins and functions of feeling economically dependent on one's job were examined among a sample of 168 hospital workers. As predicted, economic dependency was found to be greater the more dependents workers have, the less money they earn from their jobs, the less other income they have in their family units, the more they adhere to an instrumental work orientation, and the less mobile they perceive themselves to be. Also as predicted, it was found that economic dependency fully mediated the relationship between 4 of the 5 antecedents (number of dependents, other income, instrumental values, and perceived mobility) and the subjective well-being of workers. Job-related income was observed to have both direct and indirect effects. Further, the relationship between economic dependency and subjective well-being was negative. These latter findings are discussed and implications drawn for the future use of the economic dependency construct.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1303-1315
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume27
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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