Feasibility of implementing a meditative movement intervention with bariatric patients

Lisa L. Smith, Linda Larkey, Melisa C. Celaya, Robin P. Blackstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Successful interventions are needed to help improve obesity rates in the United States. Roughly two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight, and almost one-third are obese. In 1991, the National Institutes of Health released a consensus statement endorsing bariatric surgery as the only means for sustainable weight loss for severely obese patients. However, approximately one-third of bariatric patients will experience significant post surgical weight gain. Purpose of study: This study is designed to determine if meditative movement (MM) would be a feasible physical activity (PA) modality to initiate weight loss in bariatric surgery patients who have re-gained weight. Methods used: A feasibility study was recently completed in 39 bariatric patients at Scottsdale Bariatric Center (SBC) during regularly scheduled bariatric support groups at SBC. A short demonstration of MM was presented after which a short focus group was conducted to gauge interest level, acceptability and the potential demand for MM programs in this population. Attitudes and intentions surrounding MM were also collected. Findings: Approximately 75% of participants indicated they would consider practicing MM as part of their post surgical PA routine. Conclusions: MM may be a feasible PA modality in bariatric patients to improve bariatric surgery weight outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-236
Number of pages6
JournalApplied Nursing Research
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Bariatrics
Bariatric Surgery
Exercise
Weight Loss
Weights and Measures
Population Control
Self-Help Groups
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Feasibility Studies
Focus Groups
Weight Gain
Consensus
Obesity

Keywords

  • Bariatric surgery
  • Meditative movement
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Feasibility of implementing a meditative movement intervention with bariatric patients. / Smith, Lisa L.; Larkey, Linda; Celaya, Melisa C.; Blackstone, Robin P.

In: Applied Nursing Research, Vol. 27, No. 4, 2014, p. 231-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Lisa L. ; Larkey, Linda ; Celaya, Melisa C. ; Blackstone, Robin P. / Feasibility of implementing a meditative movement intervention with bariatric patients. In: Applied Nursing Research. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 231-236.
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