Familism Values, Perspective Taking, and Prosocial Moral Reasoning: Predicting Prosocial Tendencies Among Mexican American Adolescents

George P. Knight, Gustavo Carlo, Camille D. Basilio, Ryan P. Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mexican American youth often engage in relatively high levels of prosocial behaviors. We theorize that this may be due to a cultural value system that encourages familism values, which, in turn, may foster the development of sociocognitive processes that promote prosocial behaviors. Two hundred and five Mexican American early adolescent youth (Mage = 10.9 years, SD = 0.84; 51% girls) reported their familism values, perspective taking, prosocial moral reasoning, and six types of prosocial behaviors. The results indicated that perspective taking partially mediated the relation between familism values and the specific prosocial tendencies theoretically linked to the Mexican American culture. The study demonstrated the utility of integrating cultural and traditional developmental mechanisms in attempting to explain prosocial behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-727
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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