Exposure to externalizing peers in early childhood: Homophily and peer contagion processes

Laura Hanish, Carol Martin, Richard Fabes, Stacie Leonard, Melissa Herzog

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Guided by a transactional model, we examined the predictors and effects of exposure to externalizing peers in a low-risk sample of preschoolers and kindergarteners. On the basis of daily observations of peer interactions, we calculated measures of total exposure to externalizing peers and measures of exposure to same- and other-sex externalizing peers. Analyses of predictors of externalizing peer exposure supported a homophily hypothesis for girls. Tests of peer contagion effects varied by sex, and exposure to externalizing peers predicted multiple problem behaviors for girls but not for boys. Sex differences were a function of children's own sex, but not of peers' sex. The study provides evidence of externalizing peer exposure effects in a low-risk sample of young children, notably for girls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-281
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

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Keywords

  • Early childhood
  • Externalizing behavior
  • Peer exposure
  • Sex differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Exposure to externalizing peers in early childhood : Homophily and peer contagion processes. / Hanish, Laura; Martin, Carol; Fabes, Richard; Leonard, Stacie; Herzog, Melissa.

In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 33, No. 3, 06.2005, p. 267-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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