Evidence for the importance of openness to experience on performance of a fluid intelligence task by physically active and inactive participants

Marc R. Lochbaum, Paul Karoly, Daniel M. Landers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cross-sectional relationship between exercise training history and performance on a fluid intelligence test was examined. In addition, openness to experience was included as a potential trait-based contributor to predicting cognitive performance. Results supported past literature demonstrating that aerobically trained or active participants performed significantly better on the fluid intelligence task than aerobically untrained or inactive participants. Hierarchical regression analysis results revealed, as predicted, that openness to experience was a significant predictor of fluid intellectual performance. When entered into the hierarchical regression equation, openness to experience accounted for 16.0% of unique variance in Culture Fair Intelligence Test performance. By contrast, participants' exercise training history, which initially and significantly (p < .05) accounted for approximately 12.0% of the variance in cognitive performance, accounted for 5.0% (p > .05) after openness was entered. Participants were, on average, more open than inactive participants. Results are discussed in terms of the possible mechanisms aerobic exercise training and openness to experience share in regard to brain functioning and performance of fluid intelligence tasks. Future research is suggested that examines biological factors known to influence cognitive performance in exercise settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-444
Number of pages8
JournalResearch Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Volume73
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 2002

Fingerprint

Intelligence
Exercise
Intelligence Tests
Biological Factors
Regression Analysis
Brain

Keywords

  • Cognitive performance
  • Exercise
  • Personality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Evidence for the importance of openness to experience on performance of a fluid intelligence task by physically active and inactive participants. / Lochbaum, Marc R.; Karoly, Paul; Landers, Daniel M.

In: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, Vol. 73, No. 4, 12.2002, p. 437-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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