Abstract

Researchers are focusing on methods to prevent diseases by pre-symptomatic diagnosis. The human cell reacts to pathogen attacks by releasing biosignatures, such as proteins. Detecting the concentration of these proteins in a biological sample may help monitor the state of health in a person. Traditionally, RNA and antibodies are used for protein detection. But they are difficult to obtain for the thousands of possible protein targets. The need for a new detection method gave rise to the idea of synthetic antibodies. Researchers are looking at designing antibodies that have high binding affinity for a target so as to detect any concentration of a target. There are several existing techniques for predicting the binding affinity between proteins and ligands, but the need to screen thousands of potential ligands requires a faster and efficient method. In this paper, a model is explored to predict the affinity using protein microarrays. Intensity data is obtained from the microarrays for different concentrations of a target protein. Assuming that the reaction is under equilibrium and that the concentration of the proteins stay constant irrespective of binding with ligands, a model is proposed to estimate affinity from the intensities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Computational Bioscience, CompBio 2010
Pages651-655
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
EventIASTED International Conference on Computational Bioscience, CompBio 2010 - Cambridge, MA, United States
Duration: Nov 1 2010Nov 3 2010

Other

OtherIASTED International Conference on Computational Bioscience, CompBio 2010
CountryUnited States
CityCambridge, MA
Period11/1/1011/3/10

Fingerprint

Microarrays
Ligands
Proteins
Antibodies
Pathogens
RNA
Cells
Health

Keywords

  • Binding affinity
  • Bioinformatics
  • Data mining
  • Proteomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

Cite this

Buddi, S. P., & Taylor, T. (2010). Estimation of protein-ligand binding affinity from protein microarrays. In Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Computational Bioscience, CompBio 2010 (pp. 651-655) https://doi.org/10.2316/P.2010.728-026

Estimation of protein-ligand binding affinity from protein microarrays. / Buddi, Sai P.; Taylor, Thomas.

Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Computational Bioscience, CompBio 2010. 2010. p. 651-655.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Buddi, SP & Taylor, T 2010, Estimation of protein-ligand binding affinity from protein microarrays. in Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Computational Bioscience, CompBio 2010. pp. 651-655, IASTED International Conference on Computational Bioscience, CompBio 2010, Cambridge, MA, United States, 11/1/10. https://doi.org/10.2316/P.2010.728-026
Buddi SP, Taylor T. Estimation of protein-ligand binding affinity from protein microarrays. In Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Computational Bioscience, CompBio 2010. 2010. p. 651-655 https://doi.org/10.2316/P.2010.728-026
Buddi, Sai P. ; Taylor, Thomas. / Estimation of protein-ligand binding affinity from protein microarrays. Proceedings of the IASTED International Conference on Computational Bioscience, CompBio 2010. 2010. pp. 651-655
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