Enabling Future Sustainability Transitions: An Urban Metabolism Approach to Los Angeles Pincetl et al. Enabling Future Sustainability Transitions

Stephanie Pincetl, Mikhail Chester, Giovanni Circella, Andrew Fraser, Caroline Mini, Sinnott Murphy, Janet Reyna, Deepak Sivaraman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: This synthesis article presents an overview of an urban metabolism (UM) approach using mixed methods and multiple sources of data for Los Angeles, California. We examine electric energy use in buildings and greenhouse gas emissions from electricity, and calculate embedded infrastructure life cycle effects, water use and solid waste streams in an attempt to better understand the urban flows and sinks in the Los Angeles region (city and county). This quantification is being conducted to help policy-makers better target energy conservation and efficiency programs, pinpoint best locations for distributed solar generation, and support the development of policies for greater environmental sustainability. It provides a framework to which many more UM flows can be added to create greater understanding of the study area's resource dependencies. Going forward, together with policy analysis, UM can help untangle the complex intertwined resource dependencies that cities must address as they attempt to increase their environmental sustainability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)871-882
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Industrial Ecology
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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metabolism
sustainability
energy
quantification
resources
life cycle
electricity
building
conservation
policy analysis
energy conservation
resource
infrastructure
energy use
energy efficiency
water
efficiency
solid waste
water use
greenhouse gas

Keywords

  • Building energy use
  • Carbon emissions
  • Environmental input-output life cycle assessment (EIO-LCA) model
  • Industrial ecology
  • Sustainable city
  • Urban metabolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Enabling Future Sustainability Transitions : An Urban Metabolism Approach to Los Angeles Pincetl et al. Enabling Future Sustainability Transitions. / Pincetl, Stephanie; Chester, Mikhail; Circella, Giovanni; Fraser, Andrew; Mini, Caroline; Murphy, Sinnott; Reyna, Janet; Sivaraman, Deepak.

In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, Vol. 18, No. 6, 01.12.2014, p. 871-882.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pincetl, Stephanie ; Chester, Mikhail ; Circella, Giovanni ; Fraser, Andrew ; Mini, Caroline ; Murphy, Sinnott ; Reyna, Janet ; Sivaraman, Deepak. / Enabling Future Sustainability Transitions : An Urban Metabolism Approach to Los Angeles Pincetl et al. Enabling Future Sustainability Transitions. In: Journal of Industrial Ecology. 2014 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 871-882.
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