Effects of an art-based curriculum on clinical trials attitudes and breast cancer prevention knowledge

Patricia M. Herman, Linda K. Larkey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although Latinos now comprise the largest minority in the U.S. population, they continue to be seriously underrepresented in clinical trials. A nonrandomized controlled study of an innovative community-developed clinical trial and breast cancer education program targeting Latinas tested whether use of an art-based curriculum could increase willingness to enroll in six clinical trial scenarios and increase breast health and clinical trial knowledge. The art-based curriculum resulted in a larger increase in stated willingness to enroll across all clinical trial scenarios, and the difference was statistically significant (p < .05) in three. Breast health and clinical trials knowledge increased similarly and significantly for both groups. The results of this study show promise for the use of a community-developed art-based curriculum in the Latina population to increase willingness to enroll in clinical trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)664-676
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Breast neoplasms
  • Clinical trials
  • Health education
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Patient selection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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