Effect of selenium supplementation on colostral IgG concentration in cows grazing selenium-deficient pastures and on postsuckle serum IgG concentration in their calves

W. S. Swecker, C. D. Thatcher, D. E. Eversole, D. J. Blodgett, G. G. Schurig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Effects of selenium (Se) deficiency and supplementation on production of colostral immunoglobulins by beef cows and transfer of antigen-specific and nonspecific immunoglobulins to their calves were examined. Eighty beef cows, with marginal to deficient Se status (blood Se concentration, 50 μg/L), were allotted by breed and age to 1 of 4 Se treatment groups (n = 20/group): no supplemental Se; parenteral administration of 0.1 mg of Se and 1 mg of vitamin E/kg of body weight; ad libitum consumption of 120 mg of Se/kg of salt-mineral mix (SMM); and parenteral administration of 0.1 mg of Se and 1 mg of vitamin E/kg plus ad libitum consumption of 120 mg of Se/kg of SMM. All cows were inoculated IM with lysozyme. Cows consumed Se-deficient pastures or hay (21 to 62 μg/kg) during the study that began at mid-gestation and ended at postpartum hour 24. Although the concentration of specific lysozyme antibodies was not affected, cows given 120 mg of Se/kg of SMM (treatments 3 and 4) had higher colostral IgG concentration (P < 0.002) than did Se-deficient cows (treatments 1 and 2). Calves from cows in treatments 3 and 4 had higher postsuckle serum concentrations of IgG (P < 0.01) than did calves from cows in treatments 1 and 2. Colostral IgM and calf serum IgM concentrations did not differ among treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-453
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume56
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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