Economic evaluation of Quality improvement interventions designed to improve glycemic control in diabetes: A systematic review and Weighted regression analysis

Teryl K. Nuckols, Emmett Keeler, Laura J. Anderson, Jonas Green, Sally C. Morton, Brian J. Doyle, Kanaka Shetty, Aziza Arifkhanova, Marika Booth, Roberta Shanman, Paul Shekelle

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Quality improvement (QI) interventions can improve glycemic control, but little is known about their value. We systematically reviewed economic evaluations of QI interventions for glycemic control among adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We used English-language studies from high-income countries that evaluated organizational changes and reported program and utilization-related costs, chosen from PubMed, EconLit, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, New York Academy of Medicine's Grey Literature Report, and WorldCat (January 2004 to August 2016). We extracted data regarding intervention, study design, change in HbA1c, time horizon, perspective, incremental net cost (studies lasting ≤3 years), incremental costeffectiveness ratio (ICER) (studies lasting ≥20 years), and study quality. Weighted least-squares regression analysis was used to estimate mean changes in HbA1c and incremental net cost. RESULTS: Of 3,646 records, 46 unique studies were eligible. Across 19 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), HbA1c declined by 0.26% (95% CI 0.17-0.35) or 3 mmol/mol (2 to 4) relative to usual care. In 8 RCTs lasting ≤3 years, incremental net costs were $116 (95% CI-$612 to $843) per patient annually. Long-term ICERs were $100,000-$115,000/quality-adjusted life year (QALY) in 3 RCTs, $50,000-$99,999/QALY in 1 RCT, $0-$49,999/QALY in 4 RCTs, and dominant in 1 RCT. Results were more favorable in non-RCTs. Our limitations include the fact that the studies had diverse designs and involved moderate risk of bias. CONCLUSIONS: Diverse multifaceted QI interventions that lower HbA1c appear to be a fair-to-good value relative to usual care, depending on society's willingness to pay for improvements in health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)985-993
Number of pages9
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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