Echoic and retrieval accounts of the long-term modality effect tested using the suffix procedure.

S. T. Huang, Arthur Glenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The long-term modality effect is the advantage in recall of the last of a list of auditory to-be-remembered (TBR) items compared with the last of a list of visual TBR items when the list is followed by a filled retention interval. If the auditory advantage is due to echoic sensory memory mechanisms, then recall of the last auditory TBR item should be substantially reduced when it is followed by a redundant, not-to-be-recalled auditory suffix. Contrary to this prediction, Experiment 1 demonstrated that a redundant auditory suffix does not significantly reduce recall of the last auditory TBR item. In Experiment 2 a nonredundant auditory suffix produced a large reduction in the last auditory item. Redundancy is not the only factor controlling the effectiveness of a suffix, however. Experiment 3 demonstrated that a nonredundant visual suffix does not reduce recall of the last auditory TBR item. These results are discussed in reference to a retrieval account of the long-term modality effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-470
Number of pages18
JournalThe American journal of psychology
Volume99
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Modality Effect
Hearing
benzoylprop-ethyl
Experiment
Retention (Psychology)
Prediction
Redundancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Echoic and retrieval accounts of the long-term modality effect tested using the suffix procedure. / Huang, S. T.; Glenberg, Arthur.

In: The American journal of psychology, Vol. 99, No. 4, 12.1986, p. 453-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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