Doing Better

Sports, Economic Impact Analysis, and Schools of Public Policy and Administration

Mark S. Rosentraub, David Swindell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Consultants on economic impact projects face a challenge in terms of measuring the estimated benefits of such projects, particularly when they are promoted within a heightened, politicized context, as is often the case with the sports facilities. Supporters and opponents of such projects hire consultants (public and private) to measure the value of the investment, which is frequently couched as an economic impact assessment. This often leads to conflicting conclusions, with significant divergences in the measured value of the project. We use a comparative case study to highlight how this happens, and to illustrate for public policy and administration scholars how the lessons for conducting such analyses are lost on policy students, and also are reflected as bad or useless knowledge in the communities they serve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-242
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Public Affairs Education
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

impact analysis
economic impact
public administration
Sports
public policy
school
sports facility
divergence
Values
community
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Public Administration

Cite this

Doing Better : Sports, Economic Impact Analysis, and Schools of Public Policy and Administration. / Rosentraub, Mark S.; Swindell, David.

In: Journal of Public Affairs Education, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.06.2009, p. 219-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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