Do faith-based providers respect client autonomy? A comparison of client and staff perceptions in faith-based and secular residential treatment programs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In spite of growing interest in utilizing faith-based providers to deliver services, little research exists on such organizations. This paper explores client (N = 68) and staff (N = 48) views of autonomy, a fundamental social work value, by comparing perceptions at faith-based and secular residential treatment programs. Based upon a postmodern perspective that all organizations convey a particular set of values, and clients will tend to select programs congruent with their preexisting metaphysical values, it was hypothesized that there would be no difference in perceptions of autonomy among consumers or staff. Both hypotheses were supported, suggesting that for consumers who desire faith-based services, such providers do respect client autonomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-57
Number of pages19
JournalSocial Thought
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autonomy
  • Christianity
  • Faith-based providers
  • Self-determination
  • Welfare reform

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies

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