Differential economic opportunity, transferability of skills, and immigration to the United States and Canada

M. J. Greenwood, J. M. McDowell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies concerned with US and Canadian immigration after World War II have been based on cross-sectional data or on limited time series data and have stressed the importance of differential economic opportunity as a cause of migration. In this study, four vectors of variables are used to explain annual immigration to both the US and Canada, 1962-1984, from a number of specific source countries - economic opportunities, transferability of skills, level of economic development and political conditions, and institutional controls that reflect the immigration policies of the two nations. Wage differentials, several measures of skill transferability, political conditions in source countries, and the policy variables prove to be important determinants of US and Canadian immigration. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationReview of Economics & Statistics
Pages612-623
Number of pages12
Volume73
Edition4
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

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    Greenwood, M. J., & McDowell, J. M. (1991). Differential economic opportunity, transferability of skills, and immigration to the United States and Canada. In Review of Economics & Statistics (4 ed., Vol. 73, pp. 612-623)