Depression among Muslims in the United States: Examining the Role of Discrimination and Spirituality as Risk and Protective Factors

David Hodge, Tarek Zidan, Altaf Husain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Depression is a widespread challenge that affects people in all cultures. Yet, despite the growth of the Muslim population in the United States, little research has been conducted on this topic with members of this cultural group. To address this gap in the literature, the present study examines the effect of discrimination and spirituality on depression with a sample of self-identified Muslims (N = 269). Consistent with our expectations, discrimination was a risk factor and spirituality was a protective factor. For instance, Muslims who reported being called offensive names were more likely (odds ratio [OR] = 3.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.82, 6.32) to report clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms compared with those who were not called offensive names, whereas saying daily prayers was associated with a lower likelihood of reporting elevated levels of symptoms (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.55, 0.97). The article concludes with a discussion of the implication of the results as they intersect social work practice and of avenues for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-52
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Work (United States)
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Depression
  • discrimination
  • Islam
  • Muslims
  • spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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