Davids and Goliaths: small power - great power security relations in Southeast Asia.

S. W. Simon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The security situation in Southeast Asia shows the ability of regional actors to constrain or manipulate great power policies to serve the interests of indigenous states. ASEAN and Vietnamese differences over Cambodia have been the catalyst by which great powers have come back into regional politics. While a stalemate appears likely for some time, there are opportunities for cross- bloc inducements. For example, ASEAN, Japan, and the USA could offer Vietnam aid in exchange for a non-aligned Cambodia. This might reduce Hanoi's dependence on Moscow and, in consequence, reduce levels of Chinese concern about Vietnam, though the USSR would be unlikely to see such developments as other than a major loss. -B.W.Beeley

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)302-315
Number of pages14
JournalAsian Survey
Volume23
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1983

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ASEAN
great power
Cambodia
Southeast Asia
Vietnam
regional politics
USSR
aid
catalyst
Japan
politics
ability
time
loss
policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Davids and Goliaths : small power - great power security relations in Southeast Asia. / Simon, S. W.

In: Asian Survey, Vol. 23, No. 3, 1983, p. 302-315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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