Abstract

Cultured meat - edible muscle tissue grown in a laboratory or factory (carnery) without the need of a whole animal - was shown to be feasible in 2000 [1] and several researchers have since suggested that large-scale production is possible [2-5]. Using ESEM principles as a guide, this investigation represents a preliminary attempt to shed light on some of the environmental, economic, and social implications of this emerging technology. The ultimate goal is to facilitate adaptive management of its commercialization and diffusion in order to prevent or mitigate sub-optimal lifecycle impacts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2012
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 19 2012
Event2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: May 16 2012May 18 2012

Publication series

NameIEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology
ISSN (Print)2157-524X
ISSN (Electronic)2157-5258

Other

Other2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period5/16/125/18/12

Keywords

  • Cultured meat
  • carneries
  • earth systems engineering and management
  • emerging technologies
  • in vitro meat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Mattick, C. S., & Allenby, B. (2012). Cultured meat: The systemic implications of an emerging technology. In 2012 IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology, ISSST 2012 [6228020] (IEEE International Symposium on Sustainable Systems and Technology). https://doi.org/10.1109/ISSST.2012.6228020