Culturally sensitive interventions and health and behavioral health youth outcomes: A meta-analytic review

David Hodge, Kelly Jackson, Michael G. Vaughn

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite Census Bureau projections that youth from minority cultures will comprise the majority of the nation's youth in approximately a decade, little research has been conducted on culturally sensitive interventions (CSIs). Accordingly, this study sought to determine: (1) the effectiveness of CSIs designed to address health and behavioral health outcomes, (2) whether effectiveness varies depending on the class or type of outcome, and (3) whether race/ethnicity moderates effectiveness. The results suggest that CSIs (n = 21) are modestly effective (Hedges' g = .239, 95% C.I. = .139 to .339, p < .001). Effectiveness did not vary significantly by outcome class or by race/ethnicity. Especially in the latter case, however, the pattern of point estimates raises the possibility of moderation with an increase in power. Suggestions for future research conclude the article.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-423
Number of pages23
JournalSocial Work in Health Care
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

Keywords

  • Culturally sensitive interventions
  • Diversity
  • Meta-analysis
  • Racial/ethnic minority
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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