Coupling Bioflocculation of Dehalococcoides mccartyi to High-Rate Reductive Dehalogenation of Chlorinated Ethenes

Anca Delgado, Devyn Fajardo-Williams, Emily Bondank, Sofia Esquivel-Elizondo, Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Continuous bioreactors operated at low hydraulic retention times have rarely been explored for reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated ethenes. The inability to consistently develop such bioreactors affects the way growth approaches for Dehalococcoides mccartyi bioaugmentation cultures are envisioned. It also affects interpretation of results from in situ continuous treatment processes. We report bioreactor performance and dehalogenation kinetics of a D. mccartyi-containing consortium in an upflow bioreactor. When fed synthetic groundwater at 11-3.6 h HRT, the upflow bioreactor removed >99.7% of the influent trichloroethene (1.5-2.8 mM) and produced ethene as the main product. A trichloroethene removal rate of 98.51 ± 0.05 me- equiv L-1 d-1 was achieved at 3.6 h HRT. D. mccartyi cell densities were 1013 and 1012 16S rRNA gene copies L-1 in the bioflocs and planktonic culture, respectively. When challenged with a feed of natural groundwater containing various competing electron acceptors and 0.3-0.4 mM trichloroethene, trichloroethene removal was sustained at >99.6%. Electron micrographs revealed that D. mccartyi were abundant within the bioflocs, not only in multispecies structures, but also as self-aggregated microcolonies. This study provides fundamental evidence toward the feasibility of upflow bioreactors containing D. mccartyi as high-density culture production tools or as a high-rate, real-time remediation biotechnology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11297-11307
Number of pages11
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume51
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2017

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Dehalogenation
Bioreactors
bioreactor
ethylene
Trichloroethylene
trichloroethylene
Groundwater
electron
groundwater
Electrons
biotechnology
Biotechnology
Remediation
rate
remediation
Genes
Hydraulics
hydraulics
kinetics
Kinetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Coupling Bioflocculation of Dehalococcoides mccartyi to High-Rate Reductive Dehalogenation of Chlorinated Ethenes. / Delgado, Anca; Fajardo-Williams, Devyn; Bondank, Emily; Esquivel-Elizondo, Sofia; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 51, No. 19, 03.10.2017, p. 11297-11307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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