Cost-Effectiveness of Ready for Recess to Promote Physical Activity in Children

Hongmei Wang, Tao Li, Mohammad Siahpush, Li Wu Chen, Jennifer Huberty

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Many school-based recess interventions have been shown to be effective in increasing physical activity but their relative efficiency compared to other school-based programs are unknown. This study examined the cost-effectiveness of Ready for Recess, a program designed to increase students' physical activity in 2 elementary schools. METHODS: Standard cost-effectiveness analysis method was used from a program's perspective for this study. Program effectiveness was measured as total metabolic equivalent (MET) hours gained. Program costs included equipment, training, and personnel costs during the 1-year intervention. The cost-effectiveness was measured as the ratio of program costs to total MET-hours gained. RESULTS: Ready for Recess cost $27,643.97 for the 2 schools in the first year of implementation. Physical activity increased by 1.8 MET-hours per day per student. Approximately 32 cents were spent on Ready for Recess to produce an additional MET-hour per student per school day in the 2008-2009 school year. CONCLUSIONS: Ready for Recess was cost-effective in its first year of implementation using 35 cents as a benchmark and it was cost-effective relative to other school-based physical activity interventions. The program may be more cost-effective if implemented for a longer time and on a larger scale.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)278-285
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of School Health
    Volume87
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

    Fingerprint

    Cost-Benefit Analysis
    Metabolic Equivalent
    Exercise
    Costs and Cost Analysis
    costs
    school
    Students
    Benchmarking
    wage costs
    Program Evaluation
    Cost-effectiveness
    Physical Activity
    Costs
    student
    elementary school
    Equipment and Supplies
    efficiency

    Keywords

    • cost-effectiveness
    • metabolic equivalent hours
    • physical activity
    • physical activity intervention
    • school-based physical activity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Education
    • Philosophy
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

    Cite this

    Cost-Effectiveness of Ready for Recess to Promote Physical Activity in Children. / Wang, Hongmei; Li, Tao; Siahpush, Mohammad; Chen, Li Wu; Huberty, Jennifer.

    In: Journal of School Health, Vol. 87, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 278-285.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Wang, Hongmei ; Li, Tao ; Siahpush, Mohammad ; Chen, Li Wu ; Huberty, Jennifer. / Cost-Effectiveness of Ready for Recess to Promote Physical Activity in Children. In: Journal of School Health. 2017 ; Vol. 87, No. 4. pp. 278-285.
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    abstract = "BACKGROUND: Many school-based recess interventions have been shown to be effective in increasing physical activity but their relative efficiency compared to other school-based programs are unknown. This study examined the cost-effectiveness of Ready for Recess, a program designed to increase students' physical activity in 2 elementary schools. METHODS: Standard cost-effectiveness analysis method was used from a program's perspective for this study. Program effectiveness was measured as total metabolic equivalent (MET) hours gained. Program costs included equipment, training, and personnel costs during the 1-year intervention. The cost-effectiveness was measured as the ratio of program costs to total MET-hours gained. RESULTS: Ready for Recess cost $27,643.97 for the 2 schools in the first year of implementation. Physical activity increased by 1.8 MET-hours per day per student. Approximately 32 cents were spent on Ready for Recess to produce an additional MET-hour per student per school day in the 2008-2009 school year. CONCLUSIONS: Ready for Recess was cost-effective in its first year of implementation using 35 cents as a benchmark and it was cost-effective relative to other school-based physical activity interventions. The program may be more cost-effective if implemented for a longer time and on a larger scale.",
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