Cost-benefit analysis of a preventive intervention for divorced families: reduction in mental health and justice system service use costs 15 years later

Patricia M. Herman, Nicole E. Mahrer, Sharlene Wolchik, Michele M. Porter, Sarah Jones, Irwin Sandler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This cost-benefit analysis compared the costs of implementing the New Beginnings Program (NBP), a preventive intervention for divorced families to monetary benefits saved in mental healthcare service use and criminal justice system costs. NBP was delivered when the offspring were 9-12 years old. Benefits were assessed 15 years later when the offspring were young adults (ages 24-27). This study estimated the costs of delivering two versions of NBP, a single-component parenting-after-divorce program (Mother Program, MP) and a two-component parenting-after-divorce and child-coping program (Mother-Plus-Child Program, MPCP), to costs of a literature control (LC). Long-term monetary benefits were determined from actual expenditures from past-year mental healthcare service use for mothers and their young adult (YA) offspring and criminal justice system involvement for YAs. Data were gathered from 202 YAs and 194 mothers (75.4 % of families randomly assigned to condition). The benefits, as assessed in the 15th year after program completion, were $1630/family (discounted benefits $1077/family). These 1-year benefits, based on conservative assumptions, more than paid for the cost of MP and covered the majority of the cost of MPCP. Because the effects of MP versus MPCP on mental health and substance use problems have not been significantly different at short-term or long-term follow-up assessments, program managers would likely choose the lower-cost option. Given that this evaluation only calculated economic benefit at year 15 and not the previous 14 (nor future years), these findings suggest that, from a societal perspective, NBP more than pays for itself in future benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)586-596
Number of pages11
JournalPrevention science : the official journal of the Society for Prevention Research
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

Divorce
Social Justice
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Mental Health
Mothers
Costs and Cost Analysis
Criminal Law
Parenting
Young Adult
Preventive Health Services
Delivery of Health Care
Adult Children
Health Expenditures
Economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{a13cd0f0d22d4069b6e1edaac3ac07dd,
title = "Cost-benefit analysis of a preventive intervention for divorced families: reduction in mental health and justice system service use costs 15 years later",
abstract = "This cost-benefit analysis compared the costs of implementing the New Beginnings Program (NBP), a preventive intervention for divorced families to monetary benefits saved in mental healthcare service use and criminal justice system costs. NBP was delivered when the offspring were 9-12 years old. Benefits were assessed 15 years later when the offspring were young adults (ages 24-27). This study estimated the costs of delivering two versions of NBP, a single-component parenting-after-divorce program (Mother Program, MP) and a two-component parenting-after-divorce and child-coping program (Mother-Plus-Child Program, MPCP), to costs of a literature control (LC). Long-term monetary benefits were determined from actual expenditures from past-year mental healthcare service use for mothers and their young adult (YA) offspring and criminal justice system involvement for YAs. Data were gathered from 202 YAs and 194 mothers (75.4 {\%} of families randomly assigned to condition). The benefits, as assessed in the 15th year after program completion, were $1630/family (discounted benefits $1077/family). These 1-year benefits, based on conservative assumptions, more than paid for the cost of MP and covered the majority of the cost of MPCP. Because the effects of MP versus MPCP on mental health and substance use problems have not been significantly different at short-term or long-term follow-up assessments, program managers would likely choose the lower-cost option. Given that this evaluation only calculated economic benefit at year 15 and not the previous 14 (nor future years), these findings suggest that, from a societal perspective, NBP more than pays for itself in future benefits.",
author = "Herman, {Patricia M.} and Mahrer, {Nicole E.} and Sharlene Wolchik and Porter, {Michele M.} and Sarah Jones and Irwin Sandler",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11121-014-0527-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "586--596",
journal = "Prevention Science",
issn = "1389-4986",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cost-benefit analysis of a preventive intervention for divorced families

T2 - reduction in mental health and justice system service use costs 15 years later

AU - Herman, Patricia M.

AU - Mahrer, Nicole E.

AU - Wolchik, Sharlene

AU - Porter, Michele M.

AU - Jones, Sarah

AU - Sandler, Irwin

PY - 2015/5/1

Y1 - 2015/5/1

N2 - This cost-benefit analysis compared the costs of implementing the New Beginnings Program (NBP), a preventive intervention for divorced families to monetary benefits saved in mental healthcare service use and criminal justice system costs. NBP was delivered when the offspring were 9-12 years old. Benefits were assessed 15 years later when the offspring were young adults (ages 24-27). This study estimated the costs of delivering two versions of NBP, a single-component parenting-after-divorce program (Mother Program, MP) and a two-component parenting-after-divorce and child-coping program (Mother-Plus-Child Program, MPCP), to costs of a literature control (LC). Long-term monetary benefits were determined from actual expenditures from past-year mental healthcare service use for mothers and their young adult (YA) offspring and criminal justice system involvement for YAs. Data were gathered from 202 YAs and 194 mothers (75.4 % of families randomly assigned to condition). The benefits, as assessed in the 15th year after program completion, were $1630/family (discounted benefits $1077/family). These 1-year benefits, based on conservative assumptions, more than paid for the cost of MP and covered the majority of the cost of MPCP. Because the effects of MP versus MPCP on mental health and substance use problems have not been significantly different at short-term or long-term follow-up assessments, program managers would likely choose the lower-cost option. Given that this evaluation only calculated economic benefit at year 15 and not the previous 14 (nor future years), these findings suggest that, from a societal perspective, NBP more than pays for itself in future benefits.

AB - This cost-benefit analysis compared the costs of implementing the New Beginnings Program (NBP), a preventive intervention for divorced families to monetary benefits saved in mental healthcare service use and criminal justice system costs. NBP was delivered when the offspring were 9-12 years old. Benefits were assessed 15 years later when the offspring were young adults (ages 24-27). This study estimated the costs of delivering two versions of NBP, a single-component parenting-after-divorce program (Mother Program, MP) and a two-component parenting-after-divorce and child-coping program (Mother-Plus-Child Program, MPCP), to costs of a literature control (LC). Long-term monetary benefits were determined from actual expenditures from past-year mental healthcare service use for mothers and their young adult (YA) offspring and criminal justice system involvement for YAs. Data were gathered from 202 YAs and 194 mothers (75.4 % of families randomly assigned to condition). The benefits, as assessed in the 15th year after program completion, were $1630/family (discounted benefits $1077/family). These 1-year benefits, based on conservative assumptions, more than paid for the cost of MP and covered the majority of the cost of MPCP. Because the effects of MP versus MPCP on mental health and substance use problems have not been significantly different at short-term or long-term follow-up assessments, program managers would likely choose the lower-cost option. Given that this evaluation only calculated economic benefit at year 15 and not the previous 14 (nor future years), these findings suggest that, from a societal perspective, NBP more than pays for itself in future benefits.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85027941815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85027941815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11121-014-0527-6

DO - 10.1007/s11121-014-0527-6

M3 - Article

C2 - 25382415

AN - SCOPUS:85027941815

VL - 16

SP - 586

EP - 596

JO - Prevention Science

JF - Prevention Science

SN - 1389-4986

IS - 4

ER -