Correlation of Etch Pits and Dislocations in As-grown and Thermal Cycle-Annealed HgCdTe(211) Films

M. Vaghayenegar, R. N. Jacobs, J. D. Benson, A. J. Stoltz, L. A. Almeida, David Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports observations of the different types of etch pits and dislocations present in thick HgCdTe (211) layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on CdTe/Si (211) composite substrates. Dislocation analysis for as-grown and thermal cycle-annealed samples has been carried out using bright-field transmission electron microscopy. Triangular pits present in as-grown material are associated with a mixture of Frank partials and perfect dislocations, while pits with fish-eye shapes have perfect dislocations with (Formula presented.) Burgers vector. The dislocations beneath skew pits are more complex as they have two different crystallographic directions, and are associated with a mixture of Shockley partials and perfect dislocations. Dislocation analysis of samples after thermal cycle annealing (TCA) shows that the majority of dislocations under the etch pits are short segments of perfect dislocations with (Formula presented.) Burgers vector while the remainder are Shockley partials. The absence of fish-eye shape pits in TCA samples suggests that they are associated with mobile dislocations that have reacted during annealing, causing the overall etch pit density to be reduced. Very large pits with a density ∼2×103 cm−2 are observed in as-grown and TCA samples. These defects thread from within the CdTe buffer layer into the upper regions of the HgCdTe layers. Their depth in as-grown material is so large that it is not possible to locate and identify the underlying defects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Electronic Materials
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 14 2017

Fingerprint

Dislocations (crystals)
Annealing
Burgers vector
cycles
Defects
Buffer layers
Molecular beam epitaxy
annealing
Transmission electron microscopy
Hot Temperature
Composite materials
Substrates
threads
defects
molecular beam epitaxy
buffers
transmission electron microscopy
composite materials

Keywords

  • alternative substrates
  • dislocations
  • etch pits
  • HgCdTe (211)
  • two-beam bright-field imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Correlation of Etch Pits and Dislocations in As-grown and Thermal Cycle-Annealed HgCdTe(211) Films. / Vaghayenegar, M.; Jacobs, R. N.; Benson, J. D.; Stoltz, A. J.; Almeida, L. A.; Smith, David.

In: Journal of Electronic Materials, 14.04.2017, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vaghayenegar, M. ; Jacobs, R. N. ; Benson, J. D. ; Stoltz, A. J. ; Almeida, L. A. ; Smith, David. / Correlation of Etch Pits and Dislocations in As-grown and Thermal Cycle-Annealed HgCdTe(211) Films. In: Journal of Electronic Materials. 2017 ; pp. 1-13.
@article{73337ca17b434f0192caad3620867ecb,
title = "Correlation of Etch Pits and Dislocations in As-grown and Thermal Cycle-Annealed HgCdTe(211) Films",
abstract = "This paper reports observations of the different types of etch pits and dislocations present in thick HgCdTe (211) layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on CdTe/Si (211) composite substrates. Dislocation analysis for as-grown and thermal cycle-annealed samples has been carried out using bright-field transmission electron microscopy. Triangular pits present in as-grown material are associated with a mixture of Frank partials and perfect dislocations, while pits with fish-eye shapes have perfect dislocations with (Formula presented.) Burgers vector. The dislocations beneath skew pits are more complex as they have two different crystallographic directions, and are associated with a mixture of Shockley partials and perfect dislocations. Dislocation analysis of samples after thermal cycle annealing (TCA) shows that the majority of dislocations under the etch pits are short segments of perfect dislocations with (Formula presented.) Burgers vector while the remainder are Shockley partials. The absence of fish-eye shape pits in TCA samples suggests that they are associated with mobile dislocations that have reacted during annealing, causing the overall etch pit density to be reduced. Very large pits with a density ∼2×103 cm−2 are observed in as-grown and TCA samples. These defects thread from within the CdTe buffer layer into the upper regions of the HgCdTe layers. Their depth in as-grown material is so large that it is not possible to locate and identify the underlying defects.",
keywords = "alternative substrates, dislocations, etch pits, HgCdTe (211), two-beam bright-field imaging",
author = "M. Vaghayenegar and Jacobs, {R. N.} and Benson, {J. D.} and Stoltz, {A. J.} and Almeida, {L. A.} and David Smith",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1007/s11664-017-5494-9",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--13",
journal = "Journal of Electronic Materials",
issn = "0361-5235",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlation of Etch Pits and Dislocations in As-grown and Thermal Cycle-Annealed HgCdTe(211) Films

AU - Vaghayenegar, M.

AU - Jacobs, R. N.

AU - Benson, J. D.

AU - Stoltz, A. J.

AU - Almeida, L. A.

AU - Smith, David

PY - 2017/4/14

Y1 - 2017/4/14

N2 - This paper reports observations of the different types of etch pits and dislocations present in thick HgCdTe (211) layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on CdTe/Si (211) composite substrates. Dislocation analysis for as-grown and thermal cycle-annealed samples has been carried out using bright-field transmission electron microscopy. Triangular pits present in as-grown material are associated with a mixture of Frank partials and perfect dislocations, while pits with fish-eye shapes have perfect dislocations with (Formula presented.) Burgers vector. The dislocations beneath skew pits are more complex as they have two different crystallographic directions, and are associated with a mixture of Shockley partials and perfect dislocations. Dislocation analysis of samples after thermal cycle annealing (TCA) shows that the majority of dislocations under the etch pits are short segments of perfect dislocations with (Formula presented.) Burgers vector while the remainder are Shockley partials. The absence of fish-eye shape pits in TCA samples suggests that they are associated with mobile dislocations that have reacted during annealing, causing the overall etch pit density to be reduced. Very large pits with a density ∼2×103 cm−2 are observed in as-grown and TCA samples. These defects thread from within the CdTe buffer layer into the upper regions of the HgCdTe layers. Their depth in as-grown material is so large that it is not possible to locate and identify the underlying defects.

AB - This paper reports observations of the different types of etch pits and dislocations present in thick HgCdTe (211) layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on CdTe/Si (211) composite substrates. Dislocation analysis for as-grown and thermal cycle-annealed samples has been carried out using bright-field transmission electron microscopy. Triangular pits present in as-grown material are associated with a mixture of Frank partials and perfect dislocations, while pits with fish-eye shapes have perfect dislocations with (Formula presented.) Burgers vector. The dislocations beneath skew pits are more complex as they have two different crystallographic directions, and are associated with a mixture of Shockley partials and perfect dislocations. Dislocation analysis of samples after thermal cycle annealing (TCA) shows that the majority of dislocations under the etch pits are short segments of perfect dislocations with (Formula presented.) Burgers vector while the remainder are Shockley partials. The absence of fish-eye shape pits in TCA samples suggests that they are associated with mobile dislocations that have reacted during annealing, causing the overall etch pit density to be reduced. Very large pits with a density ∼2×103 cm−2 are observed in as-grown and TCA samples. These defects thread from within the CdTe buffer layer into the upper regions of the HgCdTe layers. Their depth in as-grown material is so large that it is not possible to locate and identify the underlying defects.

KW - alternative substrates

KW - dislocations

KW - etch pits

KW - HgCdTe (211)

KW - two-beam bright-field imaging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85017428830&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85017428830&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11664-017-5494-9

DO - 10.1007/s11664-017-5494-9

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85017428830

SP - 1

EP - 13

JO - Journal of Electronic Materials

JF - Journal of Electronic Materials

SN - 0361-5235

ER -