Contribution of wastewater to DBP formation

Stuart W. Krasner, Russell Chinn, Yingbo C. Guo, Cordelia J. Hwang, Salvador J. Pastor, Michael J. Sclimenti, Paul Westerhoff, Baiyang Chen, Zaid K. Chowdhury, Shahnawaz Sinha, Bruce Rittmann

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors are conducting a project to evaluate how wastewater-derived disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and their precursors contribute to DBPs in drinking water. Here, a field survey of many different types of wastewater treatment plants documents that they are sources of halogenated DBPs, if chlorine disinfection is practiced, and DBP precursors in all cases. Because the level of ammonia in treated wastewater usually is high, the addition of chlorine typically forms combined chlorine (chloramines), which minimizes the instantaneous formation of most halogenated DBPs. However, nitrosamines (e.g, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]) often are formed. Treated wastewater contains residual drinking water natural organic matter (NOM). Although the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of the effluent organic matter (EfOM) is relatively high compared to drinking water, the humic content of the EfOM - based on specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) - is relatively low. Waters low in SUVA tend to be less reactive with chlorine and typically form less trihalomethanes (THMs) and other DBPs per unit DOC. The presence of THM precursors and, in some cases, haloacetic acid precursors correlates best with SUVA. Preliminary data suggest that the formation of certain nitrogenous DBPs (e.g., haloacetonitriles and nitrosamines) or the presence of their precursors in treated wastewater is significant. The presence of precursors for some nitrogenous DBPs correlates with the level of dissolved organic nitrogen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAWWA 124th Annual Conference and Exposition: The World's Water Event, ACE 2005
StatePublished - 2005
EventAWWA 124th Annual Conference and Exposition: The World's Water Event, ACE 2005 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Jun 12 2005Jun 16 2005

Other

OtherAWWA 124th Annual Conference and Exposition: The World's Water Event, ACE 2005
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period6/12/056/16/05

Fingerprint

disinfection
wastewater
absorbance
drinking water
organic matter
dissolved organic carbon
effluent
dissolved organic nitrogen
field survey
ammonia
acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Krasner, S. W., Chinn, R., Guo, Y. C., Hwang, C. J., Pastor, S. J., Sclimenti, M. J., ... Rittmann, B. (2005). Contribution of wastewater to DBP formation. In AWWA 124th Annual Conference and Exposition: The World's Water Event, ACE 2005

Contribution of wastewater to DBP formation. / Krasner, Stuart W.; Chinn, Russell; Guo, Yingbo C.; Hwang, Cordelia J.; Pastor, Salvador J.; Sclimenti, Michael J.; Westerhoff, Paul; Chen, Baiyang; Chowdhury, Zaid K.; Sinha, Shahnawaz; Rittmann, Bruce.

AWWA 124th Annual Conference and Exposition: The World's Water Event, ACE 2005. 2005.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Krasner, SW, Chinn, R, Guo, YC, Hwang, CJ, Pastor, SJ, Sclimenti, MJ, Westerhoff, P, Chen, B, Chowdhury, ZK, Sinha, S & Rittmann, B 2005, Contribution of wastewater to DBP formation. in AWWA 124th Annual Conference and Exposition: The World's Water Event, ACE 2005. AWWA 124th Annual Conference and Exposition: The World's Water Event, ACE 2005, San Francisco, CA, United States, 6/12/05.
Krasner SW, Chinn R, Guo YC, Hwang CJ, Pastor SJ, Sclimenti MJ et al. Contribution of wastewater to DBP formation. In AWWA 124th Annual Conference and Exposition: The World's Water Event, ACE 2005. 2005
Krasner, Stuart W. ; Chinn, Russell ; Guo, Yingbo C. ; Hwang, Cordelia J. ; Pastor, Salvador J. ; Sclimenti, Michael J. ; Westerhoff, Paul ; Chen, Baiyang ; Chowdhury, Zaid K. ; Sinha, Shahnawaz ; Rittmann, Bruce. / Contribution of wastewater to DBP formation. AWWA 124th Annual Conference and Exposition: The World's Water Event, ACE 2005. 2005.
@inproceedings{9d71a14947a74dc09218c4cf8fc41be5,
title = "Contribution of wastewater to DBP formation",
abstract = "The authors are conducting a project to evaluate how wastewater-derived disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and their precursors contribute to DBPs in drinking water. Here, a field survey of many different types of wastewater treatment plants documents that they are sources of halogenated DBPs, if chlorine disinfection is practiced, and DBP precursors in all cases. Because the level of ammonia in treated wastewater usually is high, the addition of chlorine typically forms combined chlorine (chloramines), which minimizes the instantaneous formation of most halogenated DBPs. However, nitrosamines (e.g, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]) often are formed. Treated wastewater contains residual drinking water natural organic matter (NOM). Although the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of the effluent organic matter (EfOM) is relatively high compared to drinking water, the humic content of the EfOM - based on specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) - is relatively low. Waters low in SUVA tend to be less reactive with chlorine and typically form less trihalomethanes (THMs) and other DBPs per unit DOC. The presence of THM precursors and, in some cases, haloacetic acid precursors correlates best with SUVA. Preliminary data suggest that the formation of certain nitrogenous DBPs (e.g., haloacetonitriles and nitrosamines) or the presence of their precursors in treated wastewater is significant. The presence of precursors for some nitrogenous DBPs correlates with the level of dissolved organic nitrogen.",
author = "Krasner, {Stuart W.} and Russell Chinn and Guo, {Yingbo C.} and Hwang, {Cordelia J.} and Pastor, {Salvador J.} and Sclimenti, {Michael J.} and Paul Westerhoff and Baiyang Chen and Chowdhury, {Zaid K.} and Shahnawaz Sinha and Bruce Rittmann",
year = "2005",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "1583213821",
booktitle = "AWWA 124th Annual Conference and Exposition: The World's Water Event, ACE 2005",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Contribution of wastewater to DBP formation

AU - Krasner, Stuart W.

AU - Chinn, Russell

AU - Guo, Yingbo C.

AU - Hwang, Cordelia J.

AU - Pastor, Salvador J.

AU - Sclimenti, Michael J.

AU - Westerhoff, Paul

AU - Chen, Baiyang

AU - Chowdhury, Zaid K.

AU - Sinha, Shahnawaz

AU - Rittmann, Bruce

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - The authors are conducting a project to evaluate how wastewater-derived disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and their precursors contribute to DBPs in drinking water. Here, a field survey of many different types of wastewater treatment plants documents that they are sources of halogenated DBPs, if chlorine disinfection is practiced, and DBP precursors in all cases. Because the level of ammonia in treated wastewater usually is high, the addition of chlorine typically forms combined chlorine (chloramines), which minimizes the instantaneous formation of most halogenated DBPs. However, nitrosamines (e.g, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]) often are formed. Treated wastewater contains residual drinking water natural organic matter (NOM). Although the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of the effluent organic matter (EfOM) is relatively high compared to drinking water, the humic content of the EfOM - based on specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) - is relatively low. Waters low in SUVA tend to be less reactive with chlorine and typically form less trihalomethanes (THMs) and other DBPs per unit DOC. The presence of THM precursors and, in some cases, haloacetic acid precursors correlates best with SUVA. Preliminary data suggest that the formation of certain nitrogenous DBPs (e.g., haloacetonitriles and nitrosamines) or the presence of their precursors in treated wastewater is significant. The presence of precursors for some nitrogenous DBPs correlates with the level of dissolved organic nitrogen.

AB - The authors are conducting a project to evaluate how wastewater-derived disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and their precursors contribute to DBPs in drinking water. Here, a field survey of many different types of wastewater treatment plants documents that they are sources of halogenated DBPs, if chlorine disinfection is practiced, and DBP precursors in all cases. Because the level of ammonia in treated wastewater usually is high, the addition of chlorine typically forms combined chlorine (chloramines), which minimizes the instantaneous formation of most halogenated DBPs. However, nitrosamines (e.g, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]) often are formed. Treated wastewater contains residual drinking water natural organic matter (NOM). Although the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of the effluent organic matter (EfOM) is relatively high compared to drinking water, the humic content of the EfOM - based on specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) - is relatively low. Waters low in SUVA tend to be less reactive with chlorine and typically form less trihalomethanes (THMs) and other DBPs per unit DOC. The presence of THM precursors and, in some cases, haloacetic acid precursors correlates best with SUVA. Preliminary data suggest that the formation of certain nitrogenous DBPs (e.g., haloacetonitriles and nitrosamines) or the presence of their precursors in treated wastewater is significant. The presence of precursors for some nitrogenous DBPs correlates with the level of dissolved organic nitrogen.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84874310423&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84874310423&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 1583213821

SN - 9781583213827

BT - AWWA 124th Annual Conference and Exposition: The World's Water Event, ACE 2005

ER -