Contribution of low-frequency acoustic information to Chinese speech recognition in cochlear implant simulations

Xin Luo, Qian Jie Fu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chinese sentence recognition strongly relates to the reception of tonal information. For cochlear implant (CI) users with residual acoustic hearing, tonal information may be enhanced by restoring low-frequency acoustic cues in the nonimplanted ear. The present study investigated the contribution of low-frequency acoustic information to Chinese speech recognition in Mandarin-speaking normal-hearing subjects listening to acoustic simulations of bilaterally combined electric and acoustic hearing. Subjects listened to a 6-channel CI simulation in one ear and low-pass filtered speech in the other ear. Chinese tone, phoneme, and sentence recognition were measured in steady-state, speech-shaped noise, as a function of the cutoff frequency for low-pass filtered speech. Results showed that low-frequency acoustic information below 500 Hz contributed most strongly to tone recognition, while low-frequency acoustic information above 500 Hz contributed most strongly to phoneme recognition. For Chinese sentences, speech reception thresholds (SRTs) improved with increasing amounts of low-frequency acoustic information, and significantly improved when low-frequency acoustic information above 500 Hz was preserved. SRTs were not significantly affected by the degree of spectral overlap between the CI simulation and low-pass filtered speech. These results suggest that, for CI patients with residual acoustic hearing, preserving low-frequency acoustic information can improve Chinese speech recognition in noise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2260-2266
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume120
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

speech recognition
low frequencies
acoustics
hearing
simulation
sentences
ear
phonemes
Simulation
Speech Recognition
Acoustics
Cochlear Implant
acoustic simulation
thresholds
cues
preserving
cut-off
Hearing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Contribution of low-frequency acoustic information to Chinese speech recognition in cochlear implant simulations. / Luo, Xin; Fu, Qian Jie.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 120, No. 4, 2006, p. 2260-2266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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